AS-SS-D

AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental

AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental

Description

Water Level Pressure Sensor

Features

  • Highly accurate pressure sensor
  • Stainless steel construction
  • Vented for automatic barometric pressure compensation
Your Price
$20.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The AccuStage sensor can be used with iSIC data loggers for remote water level, tide gauge, or wave measurement systems.
What's Included:
  • (1) Vented sensor with 20m cable
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental AS-SS-D Rental of NexSens AccuStage vented water level sensor, priced per day
$20.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental AS-SS-2D Rental of NexSens AccuStage vented water level sensor, priced per 2-day period
$32.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental AS-SS-W Rental of NexSens AccuStage vented water level sensor, priced per week
$56.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental AS-SS-2W Rental of NexSens AccuStage vented water level sensor, priced per 2-week period
$84.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
AccuStage Water Level Sensor Rental AS-SS-M Rental of NexSens AccuStage vented water level sensor, priced per month
$120.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
3100-MAST Cellular Telemetry System Rental 3100-MAST-D Rental of NexSens 3100-iSIC data logging system with cellular modem telemetry & solar panel kit, priced per day
$80.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
Can I use the AccuStage Sensor with a SDL500 rental?
Yes, The absolute (non-vented) AccuStage is used with the SDL500 data logger. If you are interested in using a rental sensor with an iSIC logger, Fondriest recommends using the vented sensor.

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