ACR ResQLink+

ACR ResQLink+


The ACR ResQLink+ is both a small and buoyant personal locator beacon.


  • Buoyant but not intended for operation in water
  • Velcro Attachment strap
  • 66 Channel GPS
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Small and mighty, the ResQLink+™ is a buoyant, GPS-enabled rescue beacon designed for anglers, pilots and back country sportsmen.

At 5.4 oz and topping just 4.5 inches, the ResQLink+™ is both a small and bouyant Personal Locator Beacon. Small enough to be carried in your pocket, clipped to a backpack or stored inside an inflatable life jacket.

With three levels of integrated signal technology - GPS positioning, a powerful 406 MHz signal, and 121.5 MHz homing capability - the ResQLink+™ quickly and accurately relays your position to a worldwide network of search and rescue satellites. A built-in strobe light provides visibility during night rescues.

PLBs have been proven tried and true in some of the world's most remote locations and treacherous conditions. Just ask the 400 or so pilots, boaters and back country explorers who were saved by a PLB during a rigorous test program in Alaska. Based in large part on the test results, the federal government approved use of PLBs in the United States in 2003.

Even in extreme conditions and situations, the ResQLink+™ activates easily. Just deploy the antenna and press the ON button. With its powerful 66 channel GPS, the ResQLink+™ guides rescuers to within 100 meters or less of your position. And, in the continental U.S., search and rescue personnel are typically alerted of your position in as little as five minutes with a GPS-enabled PLB such as the ResQLink+™.

Two built-in tests allow you to routinely verify that the ResQLink+™ is functioning and ready for use - with the push of a button, you can easily test internal electronics and GPS functionality.

*All units shipping to Canada must be programmed before they are shipped 

Programmed for USA. For foreign flagged vessels or non-USA residents, please refer to SKU 33712 for programming services.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
ACR ResQLink+ 2881 ResQLink+ 406MHz GPS PLB
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
ACR EPIRB Programming Service 9479 EPIRB programming service for international use only
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