Adventure Medical Marine 600

Adventure Medical Marine 600
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Medical Marine 600

The Adventure Medical Marine 600 Kit is intended for coastal cruising on vessels carrying up to eight people. Crew members will find everything they need to care for a large group on an extended trip in easily accessible, waterproof pockets, thanks to the Easy CareT organization system. Key features include easy reference injury cards, waterproof pockets for medications, supplies to treat basic and advanced illnesses and trauma, a Comprehensive Guide to Marine Medicine, numerous bandages and dressings. All this is enclosed in a durable and waterproof, floating dry box case.

Administer CPR Safely
High Quality CPR Face Shield for protected mouth-to-mouth resuscitation

Built for Marine Environments
Waterproof case and inner waterproof bags keep contents dry

Clean and Close Wounds
Irrigation syringe and wound closure strips to clean and close wounds.

Manage Pain and Illness
A wide array of medications to treat pain, inflammation, and common allergies, with full tube of After Burnr to treat sunburns and stove burns.

Prevent Hypothermia and Shock
Emergency heat reflective blanket reflects 90% of radiated body heat.

Provide Hospital-Quality Care
Hospital-quality tools, including EMT Sheers and precision forceps set the standard for travel medical care.

Reduce Swelling, Stabilize Fractures & Sprains
Flexible C-Splint with triangular bandage, elastic bandage and instant cold pack to reduce swelling and manage fractures and sprains.

Yellow, waterproof dryflex box

Be Prepared in an Emergency
Important lifesaving instructions for marine emergencies printed on back of case (Mayday, Pan-Pan, fires, engine failure, and others).

Upgrades Include:
CPR Face Shield, triangular bandage, sterile eye wash, as well as larger quantities of medications and wound care items. Bandage Materials 20 - Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, 1" x 3" 2 - Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, 2" x 4.5" 15 - Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, Fingertip 15 - Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, Knuckle 2 - Bandage, Conforming Gauze, 2" 1 - Bandage, Stockinette Tubular, 1" x 4" 2 - Dressing, Gauze, Sterile, 4" x 4" , Pkg./2 4 - Dressing, Non-Adherent, Sterile, 3" x 4" 2 - Eye Pad, Sterile Bleeding 2 - Gloves, Nitrile (Pair) 1 - Instructions, Easy Care Bleeding 1 - Trauma Pad, 5" x 9" Blister / Burn 2 - Aloe Vera Gel with Lidocaine, 6 ml 1 - Moleskin, Pre-Cut & Shaped (14 pieces) CPR 1 - CPR Face Shield Fracture / Sprain 1 - Bandage, Elastic with Velcro, 3" 1 - Bandage, Triangular 2 - Cold Pack 1 - Instructions, Easy Care Fracture & Sprain 1 - C-Splint 4" x 36" Survival Tools 1 - Emergency Reflective Blanket, 84" x 56" Instrument 1 - Pencil 3 - Safety Pins 1 - Scissors, Bandage with Blunt Tip 1 - Splinter Picker/Tick Remover Forceps Medical Information 1 - Comp. Guide to Marine Medicine Medication 5 - Acetaminophen (500 mg), Pkg./2 2 - After Bite Wipe 2 - Antihistamine (Diphenhydramine 25 mg) 2 - Aspirin (325 mg), Pkg./2 1 - Eye Wash, 2/3 oz, (20 ml) 5 - Ibuprofen (200 mg), Pkg./2 1 - Instructions, Easy Care Medications 5 - Meclizine (HCI 25 mg), Pkg./2 Wound Care 15 - Antiseptic Wipe 2 - Cotton Tip Applicator, Pkg./2 1 - Instructions, Easy Care Wound 1 - Povidone Iodine, 3/4 oz 1 - Syringe, Irrigation, 20 cc, 18 Gauge Tip 1 - Tape, 1" x 10 Yards 2 - Tincture of Benzoin Topical Adhesive, 2 oz. 6 - Triple Antibiotic Ointment, Single Use 1 - Wound Closure Strips, 1/4" x 4" , Pkg./10

*Some medications may not be available in products sold outside of the US, additional items may be substituted.

Upgraded items include Waterproof Case with pressure value Quikclot Advanced Clotting Gauze Emergency Reflective Blanket After cuts & scrapes 1 oz Pump After Burn Aloe Vera Gel 2 oz Tube.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Adventure Medical Marine 600 0115-0600 ADVENTURE MEDICAL MARINE 600
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