403.31

AMS 5/8" Threaded Multi-Stage Sludge Sampler

AMS 5/8" Threaded Multi-Stage Sludge Sampler

Description

The multi-stage sludge and sediment sampler lets you easily collect sediment or sludge with a technically enhanced core tip and cap.

Features

  • Valved core tip fills the sampler without losing the sample upon retrieval
  • Flap cap allows excess air and water to escape through the top of the sampler
  • Up to 4 optional 12" sections can be added to the sampler
Free Shipping on this product
Your Price
$568.40
Drop ships from manufacturer

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The AMS "valved core tip" fills the sampler without losing the sample upon retrieval. The sampler uses a disposable plastic soil catcher that fits on the end of a 2" x 12" plastic liner. The core tip allows the plastic soil core catcher and liner to fit snugly over the lip of the core tip. Once the soil core catcher and liner are placed on the core tip they are loaded into a standard multi-stage base section and screwed together.

During deployment , the flap cap opens and allows excess air and water to escape through the top of the sampler eliminating pressure buildup. The sediment enters and fills the liner. When the sampler is lifted the flap closes and creates suction to assist the soil core catcher in retaining the sample. Up to 4 optional 12" sections can be added.
What's Included:
  • (1) Multi-stage flap check cap
  • (1) Multi-stage sludge core tip
  • (1) 12" multi-stage SCS base
  • (1) 2" x 12" plastic liner
  • (2) Plastic end caps
  • (1) 2" soil core catcher
  • (1) Universal slip wrench
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS 5/8" Threaded Multi-Stage Sludge Sampler 403.31 Mutli-Stage Sludge Sampler
$568.40
Drop ships from manufacturer

In The News

Amazon sediment studied through Andes trip down tributary

A team of researchers led by scientists from the University of South Carolina Dornsife traveled to the Peruvian jungle to understand how sediment and plant matter travel down the Andes Mountains and into the Amazon River system, according a first-person account from Sarah Feakins, assistant professor of earth sciences at USC Dornsife. The team focused on a tributary to the Amazon River, the Kosnipata River. They started at the headwaters, traveling up treacherous gravel mountain roads. They ended in the Amazonian floodplain, where Feakins said the river was orange from colloids in the soil. The team spent most of their time collecting and filtering water to obtain sediment samples. Feakins described the work as collecting by day and filtering by night.

Read More

50-year fertilizer study shows mixed results on soil quality

A new report authored by researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests that the use of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for fertilization improves crop yields, but can have negative impacts on soil quality, the  American Society of Agronomy has reported . A study of crop lands in western Kansas has shown that inorganic fertilization increases organic carbon stocks while damaging soil’s structural quality. Researchers collected soil samples from experimental fields fertilized with various amounts of inorganic fertilizers to determine how different nutrient levels might impact soil quality. The results showed that applying nitrogen and phosphorus at high rates can expedite soil erosion and cause other structural issues.

Read More

Data Buoys Study Turbid Water Environments in Lake Erie Basin

What started as a study into a relatively unexamined type of cyanobacteria has turned biologists from Bowling Green State University into an integral part of the effort to monitor and protect the drinking water in Sandusky, Ohio. Dr. George Bullerjahn, the Professor of Research Excellence at Bowling Green State University, has done considerable work in the study of beneficial cyanobacterial organisms in the eastern and central basins of Lake Erie. His current project is focused on the growth of the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix in Sandusky Bay. Over the course of his career Bullerjahn has collaborated with Dr. Steven Wilhelm from the University of Tennessee.

Read More