AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe

AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe


With a core catcher, the AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe is ideal for conducting research on loose soil samples, as well as ensuring full sample recovery.


  • Includes seven different probe parts
  • Completely replaceable tip
  • Can be used in a variety of unconsolidated soils and sands
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


The AMS Sand Sludge Sediment probe is ideal for conducting research on a wide range of unconsolidated soils and sands. A core catcher ensures full sample recovery. Each probe's tip is guaranteed to be completely replaceable. With seven different parts included, this probe offers versatility and affordability.
What's Included:
  • (1) 1 1/4" x 24" Probe body
  • (1) 1" Core catcher
  • (1) 10" Gripped cross handle
  • (1) 1" x 24" Plastic liner
  • (2) 1" Plastic end caps
  • (1) Replaceable tip
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe 424.37 Sand sludge sediment probe
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Plastic Liners 425.04 1" X 24" Plastic Liner
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AMS Liner Caps 425.18 Plastic liner end cap, 1"
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AMS 56799 Replaceable sand probe tip
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