424.37

AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe

AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe

Description

With a core catcher, the AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe is ideal for conducting research on loose soil samples, as well as ensuring full sample recovery.

Features

  • Includes seven different probe parts
  • Completely replaceable tip
  • Can be used in a variety of unconsolidated soils and sands
Free Shipping on this product
Your Price
$202.50
Drop ships from manufacturer

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The AMS Sand Sludge Sediment probe is ideal for conducting research on a wide range of unconsolidated soils and sands. A core catcher ensures full sample recovery. Each probe's tip is guaranteed to be completely replaceable. With seven different parts included, this probe offers versatility and affordability.
What's Included:
  • (1) 1 1/4" x 24" Probe body
  • (1) 1" Core catcher
  • (1) 10" Gripped cross handle
  • (1) 1" x 24" Plastic liner
  • (2) 1" Plastic end caps
  • (1) Replaceable tip
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe 424.37 Sand sludge sediment probe
$202.50
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Plastic Liners 425.04 1" X 24" Plastic Liner
$2.70
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Liner Caps 425.18 Plastic liner end cap, 1"
$0.40
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS 56799 Replaceable sand probe tip
$33.20
Drop ships from manufacturer

In The News

Dutch researchers to explore seldom-seen deep water reefs

A deep water reef off the coast of a small island in the Dutch Caribbean will be explored at depths yet to be seen by scientists, according to a press release from the Netherlands’ Wageningen University . The researchers will be mapping biodiversity and collecting samples from reefs off the coast of Bonaire. They plan to travel as deep as 300 meters to observe the biodiverse and mostly unexplored reefs. A submersible from Bonaire’s Curacao Public Aquarium will take researchers down to do their observations. The sub's sediment core sampler will help the team analyze sediment in the reefs. Biological samples will be analyzed and their DNA will be coded in a molecular lab in the Netherelands’ Naturalis Biodiversity Center.

Read More

Algae Bloom Spawns New Water Monitoring Program In Utah Lake

The result of a harmful algae bloom in the summer of 2016, the enhanced Utah Lake water quality monitoring program, reached its one year milestone in September. Located near the Provo and Orem metropolitan areas, the lake is Utah’s largest freshwater body and a popular water recreation and fishing spot. In the summer of 2016, recreation users reported an unusual amount of scum on the surface of the water. Utah Lake is monitored by the Utah Division of Water Quality (UDWQ). Prior to the 2016 harmful algae bloom (HAB), the UDWQ successfully used regular water sample testing and citizen reporting to stay on top of any incidents.

Read More

Data Buoys Study Turbid Water Environments in Lake Erie Basin

What started as a study into a relatively unexamined type of cyanobacteria has turned biologists from Bowling Green State University into an integral part of the effort to monitor and protect the drinking water in Sandusky, Ohio. Dr. George Bullerjahn, the Professor of Research Excellence at Bowling Green State University, has done considerable work in the study of beneficial cyanobacterial organisms in the eastern and central basins of Lake Erie. His current project is focused on the growth of the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix in Sandusky Bay. Over the course of his career Bullerjahn has collaborated with Dr. Steven Wilhelm from the University of Tennessee.

Read More