425.50

AMS Replaceable Tip Regular Soil Probe

AMS Replaceable Tip Regular Soil Probe

Description

The AMS Replaceable Tip Soil Probes is rugged, durable, and economical.

Features

  • Can accommodate other AMS soil probe tips
  • Includes a 10" comfortably-gripped cross handle
  • Compatible with AMS 5/8" threaded slide hammers and extensions
Your Price
$118.20
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Details

The replaceable tip soil probe comes with an AMS regular coring soil probe tip, but can accommodate other AMS soil probe tips. They are made of a heavy 4130 alloy steel, chrome plated, and fitted with a removable, heat treated tip for durability and ease of replacement.

Like all AMS soil probes, the probe includes a 10" comfortably-gripped cross handle and is compatible with AMS 5/8" Threaded Slide Hammers and extensions for deeper sampling in tough areas.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Replaceable Tip Regular Soil Probe 425.50 1" x 36" Plated Replaceable Tip Soil Probe w/Handle
$118.20
Drop ships from manufacturer

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