AMS One-Piece Turf Probe

AMS One-Piece Turf Probe


The small diameter of the AMS One-Piece Turf Probe helps minimize damage to turf and grass.


  • Collects small 1/2" diameter soil sample
  • Built-in 10" comfortably gripped cross handle
  • Slot length on 20" turf probe is 7"
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


The AMS Turf Probe is designed to collect a small 1/2" diameter soil sample from sod or grassed areas that can be up to 7" in depth.

The AMS One-Piece Turf Probe is made from nickel-plated carbon steel and has a built-in 10" comfortably gripped cross handle. The sturdy design of the turf probe resists bending and twisting. The wide slot in the turf probe body allows for easy removal of the soil sample as the tip cuts a soil core that is slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the turf probe itself. The top of the slot is closed to prevent turf, grass, or soil from being trapped in the upper section of the turf probe. A corrosion resistant 10" cross handle is permanently attached to the probe and fitted with comfortable grips.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS One-Piece Turf Probe 427.24 20" Plated One Piece Turf Probe
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