402.23

AMS Professional Soil Sampling Kits

AMS Professional Soil Sampling Kits

Description

AMS professional soil sampling kits are designed for soil sampling professionals who want the strongest, most durable connection on all of their augers, extensions, cross handles, slide hammers, and split-core samplers.

Features

  • Components stronger and more durable than standard kit
  • 3/4" threaded connection and 11 gauge cutting teeth
  • Durable welds and extra tungsten carbide hard surfacing
Your Price
$2,018.20
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Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

AMS professional soil sampling kits are designed for soil sampling professionals who want the strongest, most durable connection on all of their new and improved augers, extensions, cross handles, slide hammers, and split-core samplers. They are AMS's newest and most impressive soil sampling kits to date.

 

AMS professional series sampling kits come with 3/4" threaded professional regular auger and mud auger (2 1/4" or 3 1/4"), as well as three 4' extensions, 18" rubber-coated cross handle, 10 lb. slide hammer, split-core sampler (2" x 6" or 1 3/8" x 6"), plastic liner, two end caps, rock breaker kit, cleaning brush, universal slip wrench, and two adjustable crescent wrenches. All of the components fit into an included AMS deluxe carrying case with handles and wheels for added portability.

 

All of the AMS professional series components have been made stronger and more durable than standard components, and they feature AMS's strongest, most durable connection type. Professional series augers have been beefed up from bit to bale. They feature the trusted AMS 3/4" threaded connection and have thicker (11 gauge) cutting teeth with stronger welds and extra tungsten carbide hard surfacing. They are also reinforced with extra gussets that are welded at both the top and bottom of the bail. These gussets help prevent the bail from bending or twisting when augering into hard or rocky soils, or when the augered hole is exceptionally deep.

What's Included:
  • (1) 3/4" threaded professional regular auger and mud auger (2 1/4" or 3 1/4")
  • (3) 4' extensions
  • (1) 18" rubber-coated cross handle
  • (1) 10 lb. slide hammer
  • (1) Split-core sampler (2" x 6" or 1 3/8" x 6")
  • (1) Plastic liner
  • (2) End caps
  • (1) Rock breaker kit
  • (1) Cleaning brush
  • (1) Universal slip wrench
  • (2) Adjustable crescent wrenches
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Professional Soil Sampling Kits 402.23 2 1/4" Professional soil sampling kit
$2018.20
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AMS Professional Soil Sampling Kits 402.24 3 1/4" Professional soil sampling kit
$2001.10
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS 3/4" Threaded Auger Handles 406.05 22" Rubber-Coated Cross Handle
$49.30
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AMS 3/4" Threaded Auger Extensions 402.33 3/4" x 3' Powder-Coated Extension
$92.20
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AMS 3/4" Threaded Auger Extensions 402.32 3/4" x 4' Powder-Coated Extension
$95.00
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AMS Split-Core Sampler Caps 402.34 1 3/8" Split-Core Sampler Cap
$186.60
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AMS Professional Slide Hammer 57780 3/4" Threaded professional slide hammer
$232.60
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AMS Professional Series Soil Augers 402.36 2 1/4" Professional Regular Soil Auger
$235.30
Drop ships from manufacturer

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
What is a split-core sampler?
A split core sampler has a vertically split cylinder that allows for easy extraction of soil cores and minimizes the chance of disturbing the sample. It can be used without a liner to collect relatively undisturbed cores for immediate examination and testing or with a liner to collect undisturbed samples to be prepared for laboratory analysis.

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