354.25

AMS Signature Series Soil Core Samplers

AMS Signature Series Soil Core Samplers

Description

AMS Soil Core Samplers allow you to collect relatively undisturbed soil core samples from the subsurface or from pre-augered boreholes.

Features

  • Collect relatively undisturbed soil core samples into liners
  • Designed for soil profiling or chemical analysis
  • Available in carbon steel or stainless steel construction
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Your Price
$420.20
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Details

AMS soil core samplers collect relatively undisturbed soil core samples into liners that may be easily transferred to a lab for soil profiling or chemical analysis. The liner may also be extruded in the field for examination of the soil core sample. Soil core samples are available in carbon steel or stainless steel, and are sized by the outside diameter of the liner.
What's Included:
  • (1) Slide hammer
  • (1) Core cup
  • (1) Core cap
  • (2) Plastic end caps
  • (1) Plastic liner
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Signature Series Soil Core Samplers 354.25 1 1/2" x 6" Signature SCS Complete
$420.20
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Signature Series Soil Core Samplers 354.26 2" x 6" Signature SCS Complete
$393.40
Drop ships from manufacturer

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