SLXRBAT-D

Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental

Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental

Description

Alkaline Battery Pack for Argonaut SL & XR Current Meters

Features

  • Fully submersible for autonomous deployments
  • Splitter cable connects to current meter
  • Includes mounting base plate hardware
Your Price
$36.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
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Details

The SonTek External Battery Case is compatible with Argonaut SL and XR current meters for unattended deployments.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental SLXRBAT-D Rental of SonTek external battery case for Argonaut SL/XR current meters, priced per day
$36.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental SLXRBAT-2D Rental of SonTek external battery case for Argonaut SL/XR current meters, priced per 2-day period
$58.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental SLXRBAT-W Rental of SonTek external battery case for Argonaut SL/XR current meters, priced per week
$102.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental SLXRBAT-2W Rental of SonTek external battery case for Argonaut SL/XR current meters, priced per 2-week period
$153.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Argonaut SL/XR External Battery Case Rental SLXRBAT-M Rental of SonTek external battery case for Argonaut SL/XR current meters, priced per month
$218.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
SL500 Current Meter Rental SL500-D Rental of SonTek Argonaut-SL 0.5 MHz side-looking current meter, priced per day
$252.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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