B14

ATI B14 Gas Alarm Module

ATI B14 Gas Alarm Module

Description

Series B14 Receiver Modules are used in conjunction with many of ATI's toxic or combustible gas transmitters to provide a complete detection and alarm system.

Features

  • Provides local alarm, display, & signal retransmission functions for gas detection systems
  • LED display indicates gas concentrations directly in PPM, PPB, or %
  • Separate trouble alarm included, in addition to the three alarm relay outputs
List Price
$$$$$
Your Price
Get Quote

Drop ships from manufacturer
Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

ATI's Series B14 Receivers are compact electronic modules that provide local alarm, display, and signal retransmission functions for gas detection systems.

The modules are designed to accept input from either two, three, or four wire 4-20 mA transmitters located up to 10,000 feet from the receiver. They are ideally suited for use with ATI's Series A12 or B12 two-wire toxic gas transmitters, or Model A12-17 or B12-17 three-wire combustible gas transmitter.

B14 Alarm Receivers are DIN rail mounted modules that can be supplied in single or multiple unit enclosures. Gas concentrations are indicated directly in PPM, PPB, percent, or percent LEL with the display range selectable by the user.

Each module provides separate caution, warning, and alarm setpoints with LED bar indicators of each alarm point. LED indicators flash on initial alarm condition and change to steady on when the alarm is indicated. Modules contain individual alarm relays for each alarm setpoint. However, each relay can be assigned to any setpoint to allow multiple alarm functions at a single alarm point. Relays are configurable for either standard or fail-safe operation and for either latching or non-latching operation. A fourth LED alarm bar and relay are provided to indicate trouble conditions. The trouble alarm and relay will activate on loss of input signal or if the 4-20 mA input drops below a specific value.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
ATI B14 Gas Alarm Module B14 Gas alarm module Drop ships from manufacturer
Additional Product Information:

In The News

Collaborative Southeast Nexus study examines region's air quality

While much of the world has experienced a warmer climate in recent years, the U.S. Southeast has cooled. Scientists want to know why because the answer could reveal keys to improving air quality and understanding climate change. To study the cooling Southeast, scientists at several institutions have joined forces to conduct the Southern Atmosphere Study (SAS), the largest study on southeastern U.S. air quality since the 1990s. These include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Atmospheric Research, National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Electric Power Research Institute. Five air quality studies fall under the SAS umbrella.

Read More

Wash. State to chart methane emissions from gas utilities

Researchers at Washington State University will quantify uncombusted methane emissions throughout the U.S., according to a release . The investigators will look at emissions from local gas systems and try to estimate a national emissions rate. Uncombusted natural gas is more harmful to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide because it has a higher warming potential. Emissions of uncombusted methane along the natural gas supply line haven’t been measured on a national scale and studying them will become more important as the U.S. natural gas industry continues to expand. The Washington State study begins in April and is funded by major natural gas utilities, the Environmental Defense Fund and Conestoga-Rovers and Associates, an environmental engineering and consulting firm.

Read More

Vancouver gets new air monitoring vehicle

A new air monitoring vehicle was recently delivered to the city of Vancouver with praise and skepticism from metropolitan residents, according to The Province. The vehicle, known as the Mobile Air Monitoring Unit, is loaded with sensors which will monitor air quality.  The city wants to monitor particulates in the air from coal, diesel and oil tankers. Data collected by the truck transmits to the city hall. Some citizens are happy to have a new mobile air monitoring station that will supplement the city’s 26 stationary monitoring stations. However, many citizens criticized the loaded Ford F-450’s price tag of more than $280,000.

Read More