ATI Q46CT Toroidal Conductivity Monitor

ATI Q46CT Toroidal Conductivity Monitor


ATI's Model Q46CT toroidal conductivity system is designed for online monitoring of chemically aggressive process solutions.


  • Non-contacting sensor is resistant to foulants and electrical interferences
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


Conductivity measurement in aggressive chemical solutions or in water systems containing large amounts of solids, oils, and greases is very maintenance intensive using conventional 2 or 4 electrode sensors.  ATI’s Model Q46CT employs an inductive (toroidal) sensor that allows measurement in corrosive samples with virtually no maintenance.

Toroidal Conductivity Monitoring Systems contain a variety of features and options to meet virtually any conductivity monitoring and control application. While not suitable for low level conductivity measurement, toroidal monitors are an excellent choice for high conductivity applications. The Q46CT is also available as a concentration monitor.

ATI’s Q46 platform represents our latest generation of monitoring and control systems. Control features have been expanded to include an optional 3rd analog output or an additional bank of low power relays. Digital communication options now include Profibus DP, Modbus RTU, or Ethernet  IP variations.

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ATI Q46CT Toroidal Conductivity Monitor Q46CT Toroidal conductivity monitor Drop ships from manufacturer

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