Q46D

ATI Q46D Dissolved Oxygen Monitor

ATI Q46D Dissolved Oxygen Monitor

Description

DO monitoring in wastewater aeration systems, effluent channels, or natural waters are easily handled by the Q46D on-line monitoring instrument.

Features

  • Optional Auto-Cleaner removes build-up on the sensor membrane, reducing sensor maintenance
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
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Details

Dissolved Oxygen monitoring is critical for aeration system process control.  Optimization of the biological process, whether it’s removal of organic material, nitrification, or nitrification/denitrification, depends on maintaining proper D.O. levels.  Controlling air flow to within the optimal range eliminates excess aeration which translates into significant energy savings.
 
ATI’s Model Q46D Dissolved Oxygen Monitor is designed to provide reliable oxygen measurement and help reduce operating costs.  Two types of sensing technologies are available for use with the Q46D system:  Membraned Electrochemical and Optical (fluorescence).  Both sensors will provide reliable long-term performance with minimal maintenance.  No hardware modifications are required to change from one sensor type to the other.  The monitor can be configured for AC or DC power supplies, and a portable battery-powered unit is available to meet a variety of monitoring needs.

When process conditions require frequent sensor cleaning, our unique Q-Blast Auto-Cleaner can be used to keep the system operating nearly maintenance free.  This time-proven system has been instrumental in providing years of worry free operation.

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Questions & Answers

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What is the Q-Blast option?
The Q-blast is an option that allows the sensor to be cleaned without a visit to the field site. Pulses of pressurized air is delivered through a nozzle at the tip of the sensor to remove accumulated solids from the critical sensing surfaces. Cleaning frequencies can be set depending on fouling and usage needs.
How often does the optical sensor disk need to be replaced?
The disk has a life of 2-5 years depending on usage.
Can I switch between optical and membrane type sensors?
Yes, no hardware modifications are required to switch between sensor types.

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