ATI Q46H/62-63 Residual Chlorine Monitor

ATI Q46H/62-63 Residual Chlorine Monitor


ATI's Model Q46H/62-63 Residual Chlorine Monitor is an upgraded version of the proven Q45H system for continuous monitoring of free or combined chlorine.


  • Monitors are factory set for either Free or Combined Chlorine, but can easily be converted from one to the other in the field
  • Reagent-less operation for potable water, wastewater, cooling water, or high purity water systems
  • Options available for Profibus-DP, Modbus, or Ethernet digital output
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ATI's Model Q46H/62-63 Residual Chlorine Monitor is an upgraded version of the proven Q45H system for continuous monitoring of free or combined chlorine. Monitor capabilities have been expanded to include options for a third analog output or additional low power relays. Digital communication options for Profibus, Modbus, and Ethernet are also available with this monitor.


The Q46H system uses a polarographic membraned sensor to measure chlorine directly, without the need for chemical reagents. When needed, automatic pH compensation may be added for increased free chlorine measurement accuracy. Systems are available to provide outputs for chlorine, pH, and temperature to allow easy Contact Time (CT) calculations.

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