Q46H/64

ATI Q46H/64 Dissolved Ozone Monitor

ATI Q46H/64 Dissolved Ozone Monitor

Description

ATI's Model Q46H/64 Dissolved Ozone Analyzer is the ideal choice for on-line monitoring and control of ozonation systems.

Features

  • Dissolved ozone sensor can be used in either the flowcell or submersion configuration
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
More Views
List Price
$$$$$
Your Price
Get Quote

Drop ships from manufacturer
Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Water treatment processes using ozone gas have steadily increased over the past 20 years. Ozone has proven to be an extremely effective oxidant and is used to remove organic carbon from raw water and destroy most pathogens present. As a result, ozone treatment is now widely used in the semi-conductor, pharmaceutical, and food and beverage industries. In addition, many large cities now use ozone as an alternative to chlorine to improve the quality of the water distributed to their customers. This is because ozone is more effective against bacteria and viruses than chlorine.

ATI's Q46H/64 Dissolved Ozone Monitor provides an economical and reliable measurement system for monitoring and controlling ozone treatment systems. The Q46H/64 ozone monitor is adaptable to any ozone application as it has a variety of outputs including 4-20 mA analog, PID control, three adjustable relays, and digital communications.

The Q46H/64 ozone monitor uses a polarographic membraned sensor to accurately measure ozone in water. The sensor operates much like a battery, generating a current that is linearly proportional to the concentration of ozone in solution. An ozone-permeable membrane isolates the sensor from the measured sample and ensures that the measurement is interference free.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
ATI Q46H/64 Dissolved Ozone Monitor Q46H/64 Dissolved ozone monitor Drop ships from manufacturer

In The News

Regional Air Pollution Control Agency Tracks Dayton Air Quality

Across the Buckeye state, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency works with district offices, health departments and contract agencies to monitor the state’s air quality. Monitoring approaches in each area is overseen by the Ohio EPA’s partner there. In Dayton, Ohio, the partner in charge of monitoring air quality for the Ohio EPA is the Regional Air Pollution Control Agency (RAPCA), which oversees 11 sites in five counties surrounding the city. The Environmental Monitor recently visited a few of RAPCA’s monitoring sites to see how the agency carries out its mission and to get an update on issues affecting the city’s air quality. Specialists at RAPCA focus on six pollutants in their work: ozone, particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, lead and nitrogen oxides.

Read More

A Look At Ohio EPA’s Extensive And Successful Air Monitoring Network

Since the passage of the Clean Air Act in 1970, Ohio has made significant strides in achieving good air quality. Part of the cleaner air the state now enjoys comes from shifts in manufacturing practices and the choices people have made to drive more fuel-efficient cars. But all of the achievements are owed in part to air monitoring efforts that have allowed environmental officials to track progress. As part of its air quality maintenance work, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency works with district offices, contract agencies and health departments around the state to oversee monitoring stations that keep track of six key pollutants: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate matter and sulfur dioxide.

Read More

Colorado River Fish Contain Levels Of Selenium, Mercury

Largely seen as pristine and relatively untouched by human activity thanks to its protected status, the portion of the Colorado River flowing through Grand Canyon National Park is anything but, according to recently published research. This is evidenced by high levels of selenium and mercury found in the fishes there. Scientists from many institutions were involved in the years-long work, full results of which have been published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. It was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, but perhaps the contributors from Idaho State University got the best end of the stick. They were looking into the food webs of the river to evaluate concentrations of selenium and mercury gathering in fish.

Read More