Q46H/79S

ATI Q46H/79S Total Chlorine Stripping Monitor

ATI Q46H/79S Total Chlorine Stripping Monitor

Description

ATI’s Model Q46H/79S uses this same standard iodometric chemistry for measuring total chlorine, but with a unique sensing technique for measuring the released iodine.

Features

  • Measurement is made without contact between water sample and sensor
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
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Details

Residual chlorine is found in many chemical forms in water systems. Residuals in clean water are often predominantly free chlorine while wastewater and cooling water can contain mixtures of free chlorine, combined chlorine, and organochlorine species. Measurement of residual chlorine in applications where only free chlorine (potable water) or only combined chlorine (chloraminated water) exist can often be monitored with direct sensor measurement. However, applications where a variety of chlorine forms can exist (wastewater effluent and some cooling water) require a more complicated measurement method. These applications generally require a “Total Chlorine” measurement and involve chemically converting all chlorine species into a single chemical form.

This is normally done by reacting the sample with pH 4 buffer and potassium iodide to convert various chlorine compounds into iodine. Many on-line monitors for total chlorine use this iodometric method, often measuring the current between two exposed electrodes to determine iodine concentration. ATI’s Model Q46H/79S uses this same standard iodometric chemistry, but with a unique sensing technique for measuring the released iodine. The system takes the reacted sample containing iodine and uses an air-stripping system to remove molecular iodine from solution. The gas-phase iodine from the water sample is channeled through a conditioning module and then directly to an iodine gas sensor. The result is that the iodine measurement is made without any contact between the water sample and the sensor. Contaminants in the sample that cause fouling and contamination of standard electrodes do not affect the Q46 system, providing greater operational reliability.

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ATI Q46H/79S Total Chlorine Stripping Monitor Q46H/79S Total chlorine stripping monitor Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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