Blue Sea Horizontal Waterproof Panel

Blue Sea Horizontal Waterproof Panel


The Blue Sea Horizontal Waterproof Panel was designed for flybridge and open cockpit applications.


  • On/Off Contura Switch
  • "On" Indicating LEDs Embedded In Switches
  • Watertight Mounting Gasket Included
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


  • Countersunk mounting holes throughout
  • Two-part polyurethane slate gray finish
  • Industry standard height and width
  • Mil-Spec chemical treatment via immersion to protect every surface detail from corrosion
  • Completely wired and ready to install
  • Includes set of 30/60 common DC labels
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Blue Sea Horizontal Waterproof Panel 8262 Horizontal Waterproof Panel, 4 Position, Slate Gray
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