Davis Turbo Meter Electronic Wind Speed Indicator

Davis Turbo Meter Electronic Wind Speed Indicator


The Davis Turbo Meter Electronic Wind Speed Indicator uses a freely turning turbine to accurately measure wind speed.


  • Turbine is suspended on sapphire jewel bearings
  • Signal is processed electronically by a large scale integrated circuit
  • Measures wind speed from 0-99 MPH
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The Davis Turbo Meter Electronic Wind Speed Indicator provides accuracy and sensitivity at a pocket-sized convenience. The meter functions based on the principle of a freely turning turbine that rotates at a speed directly proportional to the wind speed. The turbine is suspended on sapphire jewel bearings to ensure maximum sensitivity and accuracy.


The rotation is sensed by an infrared light beam which adds not friction. The resulting signal is processed electronically by a large scale integrated circuit that improves reliability. The three digit display is easily viewed in bright sunlight. A switch selects between four different scales including knots, feet per minute, meters per second, and miles per hour. It measures wind speed from 0 to 99 miles per hour.

Notable Specifications:
  • Wind: No
  • Product dimensions: 4.7"H x 2.6"W x 0.7"D
  • Box dimensions: 2"H x 4"W x 6"L
  • Weight: 0.4lbs
What's Included:
  • (1) Wind speed indicator
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Davis Turbo Meter Electronic Wind Speed Indicator 271 Turbo meter electronic wind speed indicator
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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