6250

Davis Vantage Vue Wireless Weather Station

Davis Vantage Vue Wireless Weather Station

Description

The Davis Vantage Vue Wireless Weather Station displays indoor and outdoor temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and directions, and rainfall.

Features

  • Wireless transmission up to 1000 feet
  • Records wind speed as low as 2 mph (3 km/hr) and as high as 150 mph (241 km/hr)
  • Solar-powered with stored energy backup
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List Price
$395.00
Your Price
$320.94
In Stock

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Details

The Davis Vantage Vue Wireless Weather Station wirelessly transmits data up to 1000 feet. The station measures indoor and outdoor temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, and rainfall. Tested to survive cyclic corrosion in extreme weather environments, the electronics are sealed inside the integrated sensor suite to provide protection against harsh weather or flying objects. The station updates every 2.5 seconds, and records wind speeds as low as 2 miles per hour, and as high as 150 miles per hour.

 

The weather station uses frequency-hopping spread spectrum radio for reliable data transmission, displayed on an easy to read LCD screen. A glow-in-the-dark keypad is used for night viewing and the domed buttons for a better feel. 50 on-screen graphs are used to compare current and past weather conditions. 22 alarms can be set to warn of dangers such as high winds or possible flooding. The radio is compatible with the Vantage Pro2, and the optional WeatherLink software can be used for extensive weather analysis and data storage. The software is compatible on PC's, Mac's, and internet versions.

 

Applications include home weather watching and gardening, monitoring weather at schools and universities, monitoring extreme weather conditions in marinas and vacation homes, and for use in fire fighting and emergency response.

Notable Specifications:
  • ISS operating temperature: -40° to +150°F (-40° to +65°C)
  • ISS non-operating (storage) temperature: -40° to +158°F (-40° to +70°C)
  • ISS current draw: 0.20 mA (average), 30 mA (peak) at 3.3 VDC
  • ISS solar panel draw: 0.5 Watts
  • ISS battery: CR-123 3-Volt Lithium cell
  • ISS battery life (3-Volt Lithium cell): 8 months without sunlight - greater than 2 years depending on solar charging
  • ISS wind speed sensor: wind cups with magnetic switch
  • ISS wind speed direction sensor: wind vane with magnetic encoder
  • ISS wind collector type: tipping spoon, 0.01" per tip
  • Console operating temperature: +32° to +140°F (0° to +60°C)
  • Console non-operating (storage) temperature: +14° to +158°F (-10° or +70°C)
  • Console current draw: 0.9 mA average, 30 mA peak,(add 120 mA for display lamps, add 0.125 mA for each transmitter station received by console) at 4.4 VDC
  • Console power adapter: 5 VDC, 300 mA
  • Console battery backup: 3 C-cells
  • Console battery life (no AC power): up to 9 months (approximately)
  • Wireless: Yes
  • Box dimensions: 7"H x 15"W x 19"L
  • Weight: 7.0lbs
What's Included:
  • (1) Integrated sensor suite
  • (1) Console
  • (1) Mounting hardware
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Davis Vantage Vue Wireless Weather Station 6250 Vantage Vue wireless weather station
$320.94
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Davis Weather Station Mounting Tripod 7716 Weather station mounting tripod
$93.07
In Stock
Davis WeatherLink Software & Data Loggers 6510USB WeatherLink software & USB data logger for Vantage Pro2 & Vantage Vue weather stations
$137.50
In Stock
Davis WeatherLinkIP Software & Data Logger 6555 WeatherLinkIP software & data logger for Vantage Pro2 & Vantage Vue weather stations
$245.84
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

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