ZDIGGPS150

Digital Yacht GPS150 DualNav GPS Sensor

Digital Yacht GPS150 DualNav GPS Sensor

Description

The Digital Yacht GPS150 DualNav GPS Sensor is field programmable for multi-mode operation.

Features

  • 50 channel precision GPS/GLONASS positioning sensor
  • Ultra tough, waterproof construction
  • WAAS/EGNOS/SBAS enabled for sub 1-meter accuracy
List Price
$189.95
Your Price
$178.08
In Stock

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Details

The GPS150 DualNav positioning sensor combines a super accurate 50 channel GPS with GLONASS, the Russian funded satellite positioning system that is now on line and providing an excellent back up or alternative to GPS. This "smart" sensor will automatically switch between the systems or the user can manually select the most appropriate for their activity. The GPS150 will also be able to utilise the European funded Galileo positioning system when it comes online (IOC - Initial Operation Capability in 2018).

The implementation of GLONASS as an additional satellite positioning system is probably the biggest step change in maritime navigation since GPS was fully augmented back in the mid 90's. Digital Yacht's GPS150 utilises the industry standard NMEA data format allowing older chart plotters as well as current generation products to take advantage of this new technology.

The GPS150 also allows the user to select a variety of different NMEA baud rates (4800, 38400 and 115200) to allow interfacing with legacy and current systems. It also supports a new TurboNavT mode which will appeal to racing yachtsmen and performance users where GPS/GLONASS data is output at 10Hz (10 x faster update than normal) and with an interface speed of 115200 baud which is 24 x the speed of normal NMEA data. This massively improves slow speed navigation data as well as providing the best course and speed data in a dynamic situation.

The GPS150 houses all the electronics in its compact 75mm antenna and has a single multi core cable for power and data. Power consumption is just 30mA at 12V. It can be used as a simple positioning sensor for plotter or VHF DSC systems as well as a precision, high speed sensor for performance sailing/super yachts. The GPS150 can also connect to the WLN10 wireless interface to allow data to be sent to mobile devices such as iPhones, iPads and Tablets. There is also a USB interface for PC and MAC users (ZDIGUSBNMEA).

The GPS150 is field programmable for multi-mode operation. There's no complicated PC hookup or software to install - simply unscrew the top of the waterproof antenna to access the programming switches. The installer can set the NMEA 0183 baud rate (4800, 38400 or 115200), auto or manual GPS/GLONASS operation and the update rate - 1/6/10Hz (also dependent upon NMEA baud rate). This arrangement also allows users to fit two GPS150 sensors with one dedicated to GPS operation and one for GLONASS operation. These can then feed different NMEA input ports on a chart plotter to allow flexible switching between the two systems.

KEY FEATURES

  • Just 75mm in diameter and designed to fit industry standard 1" mounts
  • NMEA output configurable for 4800, 38400 and 115200 baud
  • Selectable update rates from 1 to 10Hz
  • Configurable in the field using simple DIP switches inside the antenna
  • TurboNav mode offers super fast updates to optimise positioning information in slow and high speed applications
  • WAAS/EGNOS/SBAS enabled for sub 1m accuracy
  • User selectable GPS/GLONASS mode or auto selection
  • Ultra low 30mA power consumption (at 12V DC)
  • 5-30V DC power input
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Digital Yacht GPS150 DualNav GPS Sensor ZDIGGPS150 GPS150 DualNav GPS sensor
$178.08
In Stock
Digital Yacht GPS150 DualNav GPS Sensor ZDIGGPS150USB GPS150 DualNav GPS sensor with self-powered USB interface
$243.70
In Stock
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