dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental Banner
DT-100-D

dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental

dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental

Description

Water Level Meter

Features

  • 100 ft. ASME tape with rugged 5/8'" probe
  • Audible and visual signal
  • Includes padded nylon carry bag
More Views
Your Price
$12.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

For measuring the depth of water in wells, boreholes, and standpipes, the dipper-T Water Level Meter is rugged, reliable, and easy to use.
What's Included:
  • (1) Water level meter with 100' tape and 5/8" probe
  • (1) Padded carry bag
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental DT-100-D Rental of Heron dipper-T 100 ft. water level meter, priced per day
$12.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental DT-100-2D Rental of Heron dipper-T 100 ft. water level meter, priced per 2-day period
$19.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental DT-100-W Rental of Heron dipper-T 100 ft. water level meter, priced per week
$34.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental DT-100-2W Rental of Heron dipper-T 100 ft. water level meter, priced per 2-week period
$50.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
dipper-T Water Level Meter Rental DT-100-M Rental of Heron dipper-T 100 ft. water level meter, priced per month
$72.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Rite In The Rain Pocket Notebooks 135 Pocket notebook, polydura cover, universal pattern (3" x 5")
$3.56
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Rite In The Rain DuraRite Waterproof Spiral Notebooks 653 Waterproof spiral notebook, polydura cover, field pattern
$9.60
In Stock
Rite In The Rain Environmental Bound Books 550 Environmental bound book, polyethylene cover, environmental pattern
$19.76
In Stock
Rite In The Rain All-Weather Standard Clicker Pens 47 Blue all-weather pen, chrome/plastic barrel
$10.40
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

Related Products

In The News

CrowdHydrology sources water level data from public's text messages

Chris Lowry’s idea was simple: set up staff gauges on local streams and leave a sign requesting passersby read the water level and text the data to a phone number. Data from text messages would be recorded and then posted to a website for public use. It was the beginning of CrowdHydrology , a crowdsourcing project that recently gained U.S. Geological Survey support for expansion into several Midwest states. Though it won’t generate as much data as official USGS stream gauges, the project will generate data points that supplement those lost from official gauges shut down following federal budget cuts. Lowry, an assistant professor of geology at the University at Buffalo, set up eight pilot sites in New York in 2011 in an attempt to crowdsource water level data.

Read More

Satellite groundwater measurements highlight drought, flood risks

A group of researchers from the University of California, Irvine are using gravity-measuring satellites to measure groundwater levels across the U.S., Popular Science reports . The team bases their measurements on data collected by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites. Data maps show that the Northern U.S. is getting wetter, priming it for more flooding, and the Southern U.S. is getting drier. The researchers say they can see a shift in groundwater levels from the current drought in the west, based on shifting of the Earth’s mass. Data collected by the satellite is too coarse to make local predictions and is limited in accuracy to 125,000 square mile swaths of land or larger.

Read More

Arsenic in Drinking Water: A Tale of Public and Private Water Sources, and Regulation

In recent months, a maelstrom of change has been rippling through many federal agencies, particularly those tasked with regulations connected to environmental science . Naturally, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is no exception, and may be one of the agencies seeing the most change . The idea in play appears to be the deregulation is going to achieve better outcomes for America and for citizens. However, recent research on arsenic in drinking water suggests otherwise, providing a crystalline example of how vitally important the work and regulations of the EPA really are.

Read More