39272

Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer

Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer

Description

The Extech Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer has an adjustable probe with detents of 45º, 90º, 135º and 180º.

Features

  • Very fast response time for on-the-go measuring
  • 4.5" (114mm) stainless steel probe
  • Measures temperatures up to 572F (300C) with 0.1 degree resolution
Your Price
$41.99
In Stock

Shipping Information
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Details

The Extech Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer features an adjustable probe a fast response time. On its large LCD display, it's capable of showing time, temperature, time zone, month, week, date, and day. The system will automatically adjust the week, date, day, hour, minute, second, and also for Daylight Savings Time (DST). Other functions include Data Hold, Min/Max, Auto Power Off, and detents at 45, 90, 135, & 180 degrees.

Notable Specifications:
  • Range: -58 to 572F (-50 to 300C)
  • Accuracy: +/-1.8F (-22 to 482F), +/-1C (-30 to 250C)
  • Resolution: 0.1/1
  • Dimensions: 6.1"x2.0"x0.8" (154x50x20mm)
  • Weight: 2.5oz (71g)
  • Warranty: 1 year
What's Included:
  • (1) Thermometer
  • (1) Wrist strap
  • (1) AAA battery
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer 39272 Pocket fold-up thermometer with adjustable probe
$41.99
In Stock

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
How do I calibrate this thermometer?
The Extech fold-up thermometer cannot be calibrated. You can check the thermometer for accuracy by putting it in an ice bath or boiling water. If you use the boiling water test, be sure to take altitude into account. If the thermometer is inaccurate, you may want to consider replacing it.

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