39272

Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer

Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer

Description

The Extech Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer has an adjustable probe with detents of 45º, 90º, 135º and 180º.

Features

  • Very fast response time for on-the-go measuring
  • 4.5" (114mm) stainless steel probe
  • Measures temperatures up to 572F (300C) with 0.1 degree resolution
Your Price
$41.99
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Extech Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer features an adjustable probe a fast response time. On its large LCD display, it's capable of showing time, temperature, time zone, month, week, date, and day. The system will automatically adjust the week, date, day, hour, minute, second, and also for Daylight Savings Time (DST). Other functions include Data Hold, Min/Max, Auto Power Off, and detents at 45, 90, 135, & 180 degrees.

Notable Specifications:
  • Range: -58 to 572F (-50 to 300C)
  • Accuracy: +/-1.8F (-22 to 482F), +/-1C (-30 to 250C)
  • Resolution: 0.1/1
  • Dimensions: 6.1"x2.0"x0.8" (154x50x20mm)
  • Weight: 2.5oz (71g)
  • Warranty: 1 year
What's Included:
  • (1) Thermometer
  • (1) Wrist strap
  • (1) AAA battery
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer 39272 Pocket fold-up thermometer with adjustable probe
$41.99
In Stock

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
How do I calibrate this thermometer?
The Extech fold-up thermometer cannot be calibrated. You can check the thermometer for accuracy by putting it in an ice bath or boiling water. If you use the boiling water test, be sure to take altitude into account. If the thermometer is inaccurate, you may want to consider replacing it.

In The News

Cooling water from Northeast U.S. power plants keeps rivers warmer

Rivers are a vital cooling source for power plants, but high-temperature water returned to rivers from the plants may detrimentally heat rivers and change aquatic ecosystems, according to a recent study. Scientists from the University of New Hampshire and the City College of New York gathered federal data on power plants and river systems and linked up river flow and heat transfer models to figure out just how hot rivers get in the northeastern U.S. They found that about one third of heat generated in thermoelectric power plants in the Northeast is drained into rivers via used cooling water. Just more than a third of the total heat generated at plants in the Northeast is converted directly into electricity for consumer use.

Read More

Lake Michigan Yellow Perch Bounce Back After Commercial Ban

For decades, commercial fishing for yellow perch was allowed in southern Lake Michigan. This persisted until 1996 when it was outlawed, giving perch stocks there some time to recover. Scientists had for some time assumed that this fishing ban would not affect the reproduction cycles of the perch quickly and that they were going to need a long time to revert back to the cycles they relied on before commercial fishing ever started. But new research led by scientists at Purdue University finds that maturation schedules of yellow perch in southern Lake Michigan are much more resilient than had been previously thought possible.

Read More

Colorado River Fish Contain Levels Of Selenium, Mercury

Largely seen as pristine and relatively untouched by human activity thanks to its protected status, the portion of the Colorado River flowing through Grand Canyon National Park is anything but, according to recently published research. This is evidenced by high levels of selenium and mercury found in the fishes there. Scientists from many institutions were involved in the years-long work, full results of which have been published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. It was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, but perhaps the contributors from Idaho State University got the best end of the stick. They were looking into the food webs of the river to evaluate concentrations of selenium and mercury gathering in fish.

Read More