Extech 42515 IR Thermometer with Type K Input

Extech 42515 IR Thermometer with Type K Input


The Extech IR Thermometer with Type K Input measures both non-contact and contact temperature.


  • Built-in laser pointer improves aim
  • Memory stores up to 20 readings
  • Adjustable high/low visual and audible alarm
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The Extech InfraRed Thermometer with Type K Input measures a wide range of both non-contact and contact temperature. The memory stores up to 20 readings and the adjustable high/low visual and audible alarms will alert users when a set point has been exceeded. The built-in laser pointer improves aim.

Notable Specifications:
  • Display counts: 4000 count backlit display
  • Range: IR: -58 to 1472F (-50 to 800C); Type K: -58 to 2498F (-50 to 1370C)
  • Basic accuracy: IR: +/-2%rdg or 4F/2C< 932F/500C +/-(2.5%rdg + 5 degrees)> 932F/500C (whichever is greater); Type K: +/-1.5% or +/-5F/3C
  • Repeatability: +/-0.5% or +/-1.8F/1C
  • Maximum resolution: 0.1F/C
  • Emissivity: adjustable 0.1 to 1.00
  • Field of view: 13:1 distance to target ratio
  • Dimensions: 3.2"x1.6"x6.3" (82x42x160mm)
  • Weight: 6.4oz (180g)
  • Warranty: 3 years
What's Included:
  • (1) Thermometer
  • (1) Type K thermocouple sensor
  • (1) Carrying case
  • (1) 9 V battery
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech 42515 IR Thermometer with Type K Input 42515 InfraRed thermometer with type K input
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech 42515 IR Thermometer with Type K Input 42515-NIST InfraRed thermometer with type K input, NIST traceable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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