DVA30

Extech Non-Contact AC Voltage and Current Detector

Extech Non-Contact AC Voltage and Current Detector

Description

The Extech Non-Contact AC Voltage and Current Detector pinpoints wide range voltage and current with sensitivity adjustement.

Features

  • Non-Contact AC current detection from 200mA to 1000A
  • Non-Contact AC voltage detection from 12V to 600VAC
  • Loud audible and bright visible sense detect indicators
Your Price
$45.99
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Details

The Extech Non-Contact AC Voltage and Current Detector is a two-in-one current/voltage detector designed for electrical testing. The detector measures non-contact AC current from 200mA to 1000A and non-contact AC voltage from 12V to 600VAC. The sensitivity adjustments are to increase or reduce sensor trigger threshold. A loud audible and bright visible indicator will alert users if a current or voltage is detected. The curent sensor detects current flow of 400mA at 0.2" distance and at much greater distances for larger current flows.

 

Applications include detecting  trace concelead wires in walls and floors, identifying hot spots, tracing current flow behind walls, in conduit, where voltage detection does not work, and tripping on low voltage HVAC or similar signal levels.

Notable Specifications:
  • Dimensions:7.6 x 1.2 x 0.9" (192 x 31 x 24mm)
  • Weight: 2.1oz (60g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Detector
  • (4) LR44 Button batteries
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech Non-Contact AC Voltage and Current Detector DVA30 Non-contact AC voltage and current detector
$45.99
Drop ships from manufacturer

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