EC170

Extech EC170 Salinity and Temperature Meter

Extech EC170 Salinity and Temperature Meter

Description

The Extech EC170 measures salinity in aquaculture, environmental studies, ground water, irrigation and drinking water applications.

Features

  • Built-in NaCl Conductivity to TDS conversion factor
  • Automatic Temperature Compensation
  • Waterproof design to withstand wet environment
Your Price
$69.99
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

The Extech Salinity Meter is an autoranging instrument that offers 2 ranges of measurement. A built-in NaCl conductivity to TDS conversion factor and automatic temperature compensation ensure accuracy and reliability. The large 3.5 digit (2000 count) dual LCD screen displays salinity readings in ppt and the temperature in Celsius or Fahrenheit. Meeting IP65 standards, the meter's waterproof design withstands wet environments. Applications include measuring salinity in aquaculture, environmental studies, groundwater, irrigation, and drinking water.

Notable Specifications:
  • Salinity Ranges: 0 to 10.00ppt, 10.1 to 70.0ppt
  • Salinity Maximum Resolution: 0.01ppt, 0.1ppt
  • Salinity Basic Accuracy: ±2% FS
  • Temperature Range: 32° to 122°F (0 to 50°C)
  • Temperature Maximum Resolution: 0.1°F/°C
  • Temperature Basic Accuracy: ±0.9°F/0.5°C
  • Power: Four LR44 button batteries
  • Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.5 x 1.4" (32 x 165 x 35mm)
  • Weight: 3.8oz (110g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Meter
  • (1) Salinity sensor
  • (1) Protective sensor cap
  • (4) LR44 button batteries
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech EC170 Salinity and Temperature Meter EC170 Salinity/temperature meter
$69.99
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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