FG100

Extech FG100 Combustible Gas Leak Detector

Extech FG100 Combustible Gas Leak Detector

Description

The Extech Combustible Gas Leak Detector has a fast response detection of flammable gas leakage from 500 to 6500ppm.

Features

  • Highly sensitive detection circuitry
  • Convenient compact portable size with pocket clip
  • Audible and visual alarm
Your Price
$69.99
In Stock

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Details

The Extech Combustible Gas Leak Detector has a highly sensitive detection circuitry that quickly detects gas leaks. The detector is a convenient, compact, portable tool with continuous operation for up to 4 hours. The LED indicators will alert users of gas leakage and static absorption, and the audible and visible alarms if the the concentration is dangerous. 

Notable Specifications:
  • Propane measurement range: 500 to 6500 ppm, 
  • Natural gas measurement range: 1000 to 6500 ppm
  • Power: (2) AAA 1.5 V batteries, 200mA consumption, 4 hour battery life
  • Operating conditions: 50 to 122°F (10 to 50°C),< 95% RH non-condensing
  • Storage conditions: 41 to 131°F (5 to 55°C),< 95% RH (non condensing)
  • Dimensions: 7.1 (180mm) length x 0.8 diameter (21mm)
  • Weight: 1.6oz (46g)
  • Warranty: 1 year
What's Included:
  • (1) Portable gas detector
  • (2) AAA batteries
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech FG100 Combustible Gas Leak Detector FG100 Combustible gas leak detector
$69.99
In Stock

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