MO750

Extech MO750 Soil Moisture Meter

Extech MO750 Soil Moisture Meter

Description

The Extech Soil Moisture Meter features an 8 inch stainless steel moisture probe.

Features

  • Soil moisture content measurement from 0 to 50%
  • Min/max records minimum and maximum moisture readings
  • Data hold to freeze reading on display
Free Shipping on this product
Your Price
$279.99
Drop ships from manufacturer

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Extech Soil Moisture Probe performs moisture content measurements from 0 to 50%. With easy one-hand operation, the meter records minimum and maximum moisture readings. The data hold function freezes the readings on the display for further analysis.

Notable Specifications:
  • Sensor type: integrated contact probe
  • Moisture content: 0 to 50%
  • Maximum resolution: 0.1%
  • Dimensions: 14.7 x 1.6 x 1.6 (374 x 40 x 40mm)
  • Weight: 9.4oz (267g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Meter
  • (1) Sensor cap
  • (4) AAA batteries
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech MO750 Soil Moisture Meter MO750 Soil moisture meter
$279.99
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech MO750-P Replacement soil moisture probe
$139.99
Drop ships from manufacturer

In The News

Soil moisture-measuring robot wanders fields like a hamster ball

Though it may look like a simple hamster ball, a new spherical robot may assist farmers monitor soil moisture levels and temperature, according to a redOrbit.com article. Developed by a team from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Technical University of Madrid), the ROSPHERE wirelessly reports information from its sensors back to farmers, letting them know when their crops need attention. The ROSPHERE moves by shifting its center of gravity, similar to how a hamster rolls in its ball. This unique method of locomotion gives the ROSPHERE an edge over wheeled or tracked robots, which can struggle on uneven or cluttered surfaces. The scientists who designed the ROSPHERE are developing a second prototype with enhanced mechanics and the capability to utilize additional sensors.

Read More

Lake Michigan Yellow Perch Bounce Back After Commercial Ban

For decades, commercial fishing for yellow perch was allowed in southern Lake Michigan. This persisted until 1996 when it was outlawed, giving perch stocks there some time to recover. Scientists had for some time assumed that this fishing ban would not affect the reproduction cycles of the perch quickly and that they were going to need a long time to revert back to the cycles they relied on before commercial fishing ever started. But new research led by scientists at Purdue University finds that maturation schedules of yellow perch in southern Lake Michigan are much more resilient than had been previously thought possible.

Read More

Colorado River Fish Contain Levels Of Selenium, Mercury

Largely seen as pristine and relatively untouched by human activity thanks to its protected status, the portion of the Colorado River flowing through Grand Canyon National Park is anything but, according to recently published research. This is evidenced by high levels of selenium and mercury found in the fishes there. Scientists from many institutions were involved in the years-long work, full results of which have been published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. It was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, but perhaps the contributors from Idaho State University got the best end of the stick. They were looking into the food webs of the river to evaluate concentrations of selenium and mercury gathering in fish.

Read More