Extech Wireless AC Circuit Identifier with External Probe

Extech Wireless AC Circuit Identifier with External Probe


The Extech Wireless Remote AC Circuit Identifier combines non-contact voltage and light detection with radio frequency transmission technology.


  • Combines non-contact voltage detection with wireless signals
  • Transmitter signals user at the breaker panel with LED and audible alerts
  • Easily identify lighting and outlet circuits with the built-in light sensor
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The Extech Wireless Remote AC Circuit Identifier enables a single user to identify mid-run wires and to find the breaker that powerrs a circuit or light fixture without having to connect directly to the wires in the cable. The meter combines non-contact voltage detection with wirelss signals to monitor and remotely report the presence of voltage on a wire.


Clamped onto a live wire, the transmitter signals the user at the breaker panel with LED and audible alerts  on the receiver at up to a 100 meter range. The alerts stop when the correct circuit breaker is switched and work can be performed safely. The identifier eliminates the need for an assistant or back-and-forth trips to confirm that the correct circuit is powered down. This tool is ideal for electricians, plumbers, general contractors, kitchen and bath remodelers, and lighting installers.

Notable Specifications:
  • Transmitter unit display: power, detect, external probe LED's
  • Transmitter unit controls: 3-position slide switch
  • Transmission frequencies: (RT30) 914MHz, (RT32) 868MHz
  • Transmission distance: ~100m in an unobstructed field
  • Transmitter unit detect status: visual
  • Receiver unit display: power, detect, communications LED
  • Receiver unit controls: 3-position slide switch
  • Reciever unit detect status: visual and audible
What's Included:
  • (1) Transmitter
  • (1) Receiver
  • (1) Clamp-style probe
  • (4) AAA batteries
  • (1) Case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech Wireless AC Circuit Identifier with External Probe RT30 Wireless AC circuit identifier with external probe, 914MHz
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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