FAX30

Furuno External Black Box Weatherfax & Navtex Receiver

Furuno External Black Box Weatherfax & Navtex Receiver

Description

The Furuno External Black Box Weatherfax and Navtex Receiver will receive valuable weather images and navigational information to be able to navigate more safely even during uncertain conditions.

Features

  • Paperless Weatherfax and Navtex receiver
  • Connects directly to a PC with a printer through a single Ethernet cable
  • Noise Rejection for clearer images
Free Shipping on this product
List Price
$1300.00
Your Price
$1,092.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Furuno's new FAX30 can turn any NavNet display or PC into a Weatherfax and Navtex receiver. This waterproof "Black Box" unit connects directly to a NavNet display or an Ethernet hub with a single Ethernet cable. If it is connected to an Ethernet hub that has multiple 10.4" NavNet displays attached, each of those displays will have access to the FAX30. In addition, the FAX30 has the capability of being connected to a standard PC with Ethernet card.

The unit itself receives valuable weather images and navigational information. When connected to a 10.4" NavNet display, the image and information is displayed directly on screen, with softkey menu options for ease of use. On a PC, the images and information are displayed by simply using your Web Browser. There is no complicated proprietary software to install or learn. You can even print all of the information using your PC and printer!

Combine the new FAX30 with NavNet's true color Radar and you have the ultimate in weather tracking. Now you can navigate more safely even during uncertain conditions.

  • Cost effective paperless weatherfax and Navtex receiver
  • Connect directly to a 10.4" NavNet display or through an Ethernet hub
  • Connect to a generic PC equipped with Ethernet
  • Selectable display colors: 8 gray tones, monochrome, blue shades, pink and black, red and blue
  • User friendly softkey menu operation on NavNet display
  • Web browser navigation on generic PC, no proprietary software required
  • Print images and messages from generic PC and printer
  • Store a maximum of 12 weatherfax images (depending on file size)
  • Navtex messages can be retrieved in a table listing of up to 130 stored files
  • Stored images/messages can be shown at any time
  • 320 user programmed channels
  • Noise rejection for clear image
  • Thumbnail view for easy selection of stored images
  • Phase and synchronization adjustments even after completed reception
  • Fax Frequency Range:

    LF - 80 kHz to 160 kHz

    MF/HF - 2 MHz to 25 MHz
  • Navtex
    Frequency Range:

    490 kHz or 518 kHz
  • 1,000 channels
  • Fax Mode of Reception:

    F3C, J3C
  • Navtex Mode of Reception: F1B
  • Waterproof- IEC 60529

Shipping Information
  • 8 lbs., 1 Carton

Power Requirements

  • 12-24 VDC, 15 W Max.


Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Furuno External Black Box Weatherfax & Navtex Receiver FAX30 External black box Weatherfax and Navtex receiver, no antenna
$1092.00
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Furuno Active Couplers FAX5 Active coupler with 15 Meter Interconnect Cable, Range: 80kHz to 30mHz
$450.00
In Stock
Furuno Hub Adaptor Cable 000-144-463 Hub adaptor cable, 6 pin (m) to RJ46 (m), 0.5 meters
$60.00
In Stock
Furuno NavNet Ethernet Cables 000-154-050 NavNet ethernet cable, 10 meter
$125.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Furuno NavNet Ethernet Cables 000-154-027 NavNet ethernet cable, 1 meter
$60.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Furuno NavNet Ethernet Cables 000-154-051 NavNet ethernet cable, 20 meter
$175.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Furuno NavNet Ethernet Cables 000-154-049 NavNet ethernet cables, 5 meter
$95.00
In Stock

In The News

Lake Superior Weather Buoy Provides Valuable New Data

A new weather buoy in a remote part of Lake Superior is providing much-needed weather data to local mariners, the National Weather Service and researchers. Scientists from the Superior Watershed Partnership (SWP), Lentic Environmental Services (LES) and the University of Colorado-Boulder recently deployed the buoy on the lake one mile north of Stannard Rock Lighthouse. SWP gained ownership of the lighthouse in 2015. Because the light was built on a large reef in a remote part of the lake, it is one of the most popular trout fishing and charter boat destinations on the Great Lakes. It has also been the location of a NOAA weather station since 1984 and a Great Lakes Evaporation Network monitoring site since 2008.

Read More

Nonprofit kick-starts water data gathering in Nepal Valley

For the first time, citizens of the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal have free access to local water data. The data is the result of a water quality monitoring pilot project started by the California-based nonprofit SmartPhones4Water (S4W). SmartPhones4Water, an idea developed by Ph.D. student Jeff Davids and the late Dr. Peter-Jules van Overloop from Delft University of Technology (Netherlands), was started in California in 2014. The goal of the organization is to leverage smartphone technology to gather water data in countries where such data is scarce. The method is simple: a network of local citizens use their smartphones to capture and upload the data to an online server and database.

Read More

Riverkeeper Initiative Tackles Water Monitoring, Activism and Education

Celebrating its 25th year, Coosa River Basin Initiative is forming a new water monitoring partnership with the Berry College Environmental Science program. Coosa River Basin Initiative, also known as CRBI , is a grassroots environmental protection organization that works with volunteers to protect and preserve the Coosa River in Rome, Georgia and the surrounding cities. CRBI is a member of the Georgia Water Coalition and the Waterkeeper Alliance. You may be wondering what is so special about the Coosa River. The answer is just about everything. The river is a vital part of the communities surrounding it. “Every river is important but the Coosa River is important in several unique ways,” said Jesse Demonbruen-Chapman, director of CRBI.

Read More