Furuno Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors

Furuno Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors


The Furuno Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors have brilliant LED back lighting making them easy to view at virtually any angle.


  • Glass display controls with LED backlighting
  • Display can be fully dimmed so night time vision is not affected
  • Can be powered by AC, DC or AC and DC power sources
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17" Multi-Purpose Multi-Touch LCD Display

The FURUNO MU170T is a multi-purpose, multi-touch marine LCD that features the unmatched quality and reliability that you have learned to depend on. The MU170T utilizes Projected Capacitive Technology (called PCTouch) to provide the ultimate in responsive sensitivity for the NavNet TZtouch black box system. The MU170T employs an extremely bright (1,000 cd/m2 ) color TFT Active-Matrix LCD with LED Backlight Technology. With its bright colors, excellent contrast and wide viewing angles, the MU170T monitor is perfect for any tropical sunlight or low light conditions. Furthermore, the LCD and glass are bonded together to ensure fog free operation on open fly-bridge installations.

The MU170T features native SXGA (1280 x 1024) screen resolution, and can auto-detect a wide variety of common screen resolutions with its built-in scaler. Its wide range of interface options include 2 RGB analog, 2 DVI (Digital Video Interface) and 3 composite video inputs. The display is the perfect match for the NavNet TZtouch series, but can also display images from security cameras, DVD player, computers, HDTV Receivers or other peripheral devices.

The MU170T display offers the ultimate in performance, convenience, state of the art design and enduring quality for system integrators and boat builders, particularly where reliability and long life time are key pre-requisites. The product range combines stunning design and technology with innovative features and options, making it all that the integrator needs for top class, type-approved marine systems.

  • LED Backlight Technology, TFT Active-matrix
  • Projected Capacitive (PCtouch) Multi Touch
  • 17.0 inch Display
  • 1280 x 1024 (SXGA) - 0.264 (H) x 0.264 (V) mm
  • Aspect Ratio and Response Time: 5:4 - 5ms (typ)
  • High Brightness 1000 cd/m} (typ) - 1000:1 (typ)
  • View Angle and Max Colors: 80 deg. (up/down/left/right) - 16.7 million
  • Synchronization Signal Auto-detect: Digital Separate Sync., Composite Sync., Sync. On Green
  • Optimal Resolution and Hz: 1280 x 1024 @ 60 Hz
  • Detectable Resolutions: 640 x 350, 640 x 480, 720 x 400, 800 x 600, 1024 x 768, 1280 x 1024
  • Video Inputs: 2X DVI, 2X RGB, 3X Composite Video
  • Supported Video Signals: Interlaced HDTV, NTSC, PAL and SECAM video, Composite Video
  • Dimmable 0-100%, Multi-power AC & DC, PBP (Picture By Picture)
  • PIP (Picture In Picture)
  • Operating Temperature -15.0 deg C / 5.0 deg F to 55.0 deg C / 131.0 deg F, Humidity up to 95%
  • IP Rating: Protection: IP66 front - IP22 rear (EN60529)
  • Compass Safe Distance: Standard: 125.00 [49.21''] - Steering: 75.00 [29.53''] cm [inch]
  • Weight: 13.6 lbs

Power Use:
  • Multi-power 115/230VAC - 50/60Hz + 24VDC
  • 60W (max)
    Note: You may connect either AC power or DC power or both. In case both sources are connected, power will be sourced from the AC input. If AC input is lost, there will be an uninterrupted switch-over to DC input.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Furuno Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors MU170T Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors, 17"
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Furuno Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors MU190T Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors, 19"
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Furuno Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors MU240T Hi-Brite Multi Touch Marine Monitors, 24"
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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