LH3000

Furuno Loudhailer

Furuno Loudhailer

Description

The Furuno Loudhailer is designed for a wide variety of ships, requiring high quality on board and ship-to-ship communications under almost all circumstances.

Features

  • Built-in high quality speaker
  • Auxiliary audio input
  • Intuitive front panel for ease of operation
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List Price
$895.00
Your Price
$751.80
In Stock

Shipping Information
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Details

The Furuno LH-3000 is a high-performance 30 watt loud hailer with an intercom function. The LH-3000 is designed for a wide variety of ships, requiring high quality onboard and ship-to-ship communications under almost all circumstances.

Solidly built and waterproof, the LH-3000 contains a high quality built-in speaker and a microphone. On its front panel, there are easy-to-see states indicators. By generating voice or eight internationally acknowledged warning signals from the horns, the LH-3000 notifies nearby vessels of your presence and status regardless of visibility conditions.

The LH-3000 can also function as an intercom, when connected to optional intercom speakers. Up to four intercoms can be connected for two-way communication between the bridge and one or all intercom stations.

The LH-3000 can be connected to various equipment to enable useful functions. When connected to an external alarm unit, the LH-3000 can function as a security alarm. An auxiliary audio input allows transmission of music or other external audio signals (from CD player, radio, etc.) to the intercom speakers and external horns.

Standard Features:
  • 30 Watt Forward and Aft Station Hailer Output Ports (20 Watt Hardware Selectable)
  • LED indicators alert you to equipment status
  • Backlit keypad for nighttime operation
  • Smartly designed and intuitive front panel for ease of operation.
  • Built-in High Quality Speaker for Intercom and Hailer Listen capability
  • Alarm Siren Capability
  • External Speaker Output
  • Six Automatic International Hailer Warning Signals Consisting of:
    • UNWY - Vessel Underway in reduced visibility
    • SAIL - Vessel Under Sail in reduced visibility
    • TOW - Vessel Under Tow in reduced visibility
    • STOP - Stationary Vessel in reduced visibility
    • ANCH - Vessel at Anchor in reduced visibility
    • AGND- Vessel Aground in reduced Visibility

  • Manually Controlled "YELP" and "On/Off" Hailer Warning Signals
  • Four Remote Intercom Stations allow two-way communication between Master and Individual Remote stations or all remote stations simultaneously
  • Auxiliary audio input allows transmission of music or other external audio signals (from cassette player, CD player, radio, etc.) to the intercom speakers, external horns or both
  • Waterproof Frontal Area to IPX5 and USCG CFR-46 (Not waterproof from rear panel)
  • Cosmetic "Family-Look" to FM3000 and other Furuno Products
  • Removable screw terminal connectors on rear panel provide easy removal, installation, and system testing
  • Gimbal Base Mount is included; bezel allows flush mount with provided cut-out template

Power Requirements:
  • 12VDC(+/-20%), 5 Amps Max, 280 mA in standby

Shipping Information:
  • 1 carton, 12"x12"x8", 8lbs

Notes:
  • The LH3000 is not supplied with a power cable
  • The LH3000 requires hardwiring external components that are not supplied by Furuno. These external components consist of Hailer Horns, Intercom Speakers, External Audio Inputs, etc.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Furuno Loudhailer LH3000 Loudhailer
$751.80
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Furuno Flush Mount Kit LH-3020 Flush mount kit for LH-3000 Loud Hailer with screws and hardware included
$24.95
In Stock
Furuno Intercom Speaker LH3010 Intercom speaker
$30.00
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

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