AIR-331-104-01

Furuno NMEA2000 Output Cables

Furuno NMEA2000 Output Cables

Description

These NMEA2000 output cables are designed for use with Airmar Ultrasonic WeatherStation sensors.

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$85.00
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Furuno NMEA2000 Output Cables AIR-331-104-01 NMEA2000 output cable with 5-pin male plug connector, 10m
$85.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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