73050011

Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules

Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules

Description

dispos-a-filters have a narrow pore distribution and high void volume which allow excellent liquid flow rates at differential pressures.

Features

  • Narrow pore distribution & high void volume
  • Allows for excellent liquid flow rates at differential pressures
  • Designed for in-line water filtration in the field
Your Price
$14.95
Drop ships from manufacturer

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Details

The filters have a narrow pore distribution and high void volume, which allow excellent liquid flow rates at differential pressures. The dispos-a-filter is a disposable filter capsule to perform in-line water filtration in the field.

dispos-a-filters readily fit on 1/4" to 1/2" sized sample tubing with a specially designed sample tubing adapter. There is no pre-rinsing, cleaning, or assembly required. The adapter is specifically designed to attach to the dispos-a-filter capsule and any flexible sampling tube for in-line sampling. Its sturdy wingnut design ensures an easy, snug fit for continuous sampling integrity.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules 73050011 Medium capacity dispos-a-filter, 0.45 micron size, 350cm2 filter area
$14.95
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules 73050004 High capacity dispos-a-filter, 0.45 micron size, 700cm2 filter area
$18.50
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules 73050008 High capacity dispos-a-filter, 1.0 micron size, 700cm2 filter area
$29.95
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules 73050007 High capacity dispos-a-filter, 5.0 micron size, 700cm2 filter area
$29.95
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech dispos-a-filter Filter Capsules 73050010 High capacity dispos-a-filter, 10 micron size, 700cm2 filter area
$22.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech dispos-a-filter Universal Tubing Adapter 73050001 dispos-a-filter universal tubing adapter, stepped barb
$0.85
Drop ships from manufacturer

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