77500001

Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels

Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels

Description

Geotech hand pump transfer vessels may be used for liquid transfer or siphoning from one container into another.

Features

  • Compression port fittings
  • Uses 3/8" or 1/2" OD tubing
  • Holds up to 1 liter of liquid
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$255.00
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Shipping Information
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels 77500001 Transfer vessel, 1 L, 1/4" ID x 3/8" OD compression ports
$255.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels 77500002 Transfer vessel, 1 L, 3/8" ID x 1/2" OD compression ports
$255.00
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech Hand Pumps 87500001 Plastic hand pump, 5' tubing (1/4" ID x 3/8" OD)
$88.00
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