Geotech Redi-Flo2 Cooling Shroud

Geotech Redi-Flo2 Cooling Shroud


The Geotech pump shroud can help you avoid damage to your Redi-Flo2 pump when used in 4" wells.


  • Keeps pump Redi-Flo2 pump from overheating in 4" wells
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Geotech Redi-Flo2 Cooling Shroud 81200005 Redi-Flo2 cooling shroud for 4" wells
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