Gerber Myth Archery Multi-Tool

Gerber Myth Archery Multi-Tool


The Gerber Myth Archery Multi-Tool makes for quick transitions and easy bow adjustments in the field.


  • Bottle opener integrated into Phillips bit
  • Flat-head screwdriver takes on all the basics
  • Stainless steel construction with titanium nitride coating for added corrosion resistance
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Gerber applies its hunting experience to the Myth Archery Multi-Tool and puts the most often used tools in your pocket for easy access. Whether you're tracking whitetail or turkeys, this self-contained multi-tool includes 12 components so you can dial in your bow or change broadheads without digging for the right tool. The integrated adjustable wrench makes for easy in-the-field adjustments.

Self-Contained Essentials
Working with dedicated bowhunters, Gerber refined this multi-tool to the essentials. A full set of eight foldout imperial hex wrenches fit the run of modern bow fasteners-with the largest one built into the adjustable wrench opening-and the Phillips and flat-head drivers have universal application. To aid in deploying the smallest Allen wrenches, simply rotate the integrated lever on the tool's body, and the wrenches lift easily-no digging for tiny Allens with big fingers. There's no need to pack additional loose bits or attachments with this multi-tool; everything you need is built into the handle, including a broadhead wrench for swapping any two-, three- or four-spine tips. And, when the call of thirst beckons, there's a handy bottle opener built into the Phillips driver.

All-Metal Construction
Climbing trees, bushwhacking and scrambling are all in a day's work when bowhunting, and it can take a toll on your gear. Gerber uses stainless steel metal frame construction to make sure your multi-tool can endure the abuse that a hunting trip is sure to dish out. An added titanium nitride coating on all-metal parts improves all-weather corrosion resistance, and a rubber handle and composite overmold give the tool a good feel in your hand. An integrated lanyard slot makes it easy to set up for hanging or clipping to your belt.

Adjustable Wrench
Setting up a tree stand is not rocket science, but having an adjustable wrench handy sure makes the process go more smoothly. The included wrench has squared jaws and fits up to 3/4-inch nuts and bolts, plus it houses the eighth and largest hex wrench for bow adjustments. The titanium nitride coating keeps the adjustable aspect of the wrench working smoothly in all conditions.


  • 12 components
  • Adjustable wrench fits up to ¾" nuts and bolts, and holds the eighth and largest hex wrench
  • Broadhead wrench is built into the handle and accommodates two-, three- and four-spine tips
  • #1 Phillips head screwdriver has universal appeal
  • Eight-piece hex wrench set includes: 1/16, 5/64, 3/32, 7/74, 1/8, 9/64, 5/32 and 3/16-inch option built into the adjustable head
  • Integrated lift lever makes for easy deployment of small hex wrenches
  • Lanyard hole lets you attach a loop for hanging
  • Rubber and composite handle over the stainless metal frame makes for nice handling and grip
  • Backed by Gerber's Lifetime Warranty
Notable Specifications:
  • Overall Length Closed: 5.38" (13.67cm)
  • Hex Wrenches: 3" (7.62cm)
  • Weight: 5.9oz (167g)
  • Steel Type: 4Cr14MoV 
  • Handle Material: Rubber overmold


Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Gerber Myth Archery Multi-Tool 31-002138 Myth archery multi-tool
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