Gerber Propel AO Assisted Open Serrated Edge Knife

Gerber Propel AO Assisted Open Serrated Edge Knife


The Gerber Propel AO Assisted Open Serrated Edge Knife is as easy to handle and carry as it is durable and capable.


  • Designed And Built In Portland, Oregon
  • Blades Use High-Quality 420HC Steel for Long Term Durability and A Quality Edge
  • Full-Size Tanto-Style Blade Is Partially Serrated For Slicing And Cutting Tough Surfaces
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


An all-purpose tactical knife needs to feel familiar and capable, like a well-worn tool, yet still offer quick action and hold up to long-term use. Drawing on critical feedback from military and law enforcement personnel plus its decades of knife design experience, Gerber set out to design a full-size, assisted-opening knife that's as easy to handle and carry as it is durable and capable. The Gerber Propel AO knife is this knife. It's a full-size tactical knife with a slim handle profile that fits comfortably in your pocket and hand.

Built to Last
A tactical knife is sure to see a variety of uses, so Gerber uses 420 high-carbon steel to give you a dependable edge. Add a G-10 composite handle and you've got an incredibly durable knife. Additionally, the Propel AO features a safer deployment than that of most AO knives. In deploying the blade of a typical Assisted Open knife, users simply apply pressure to the ambidextrous thumb stud. However, in the case of the Propel AO, instead of applying pressure upwards and parallel to the knife's case, the blade will deploy when engaged at about 45 degrees to the side. This, along with the knife's narrow aperture of blade access, ensures the blade doesn't deploy accidentally while being pulled with speed from the pocket. Once the blade is engaged it can be locked into place during use. The tanto-style blade's black oxide coating adds a stealth element, while its partial serration adds all-purpose utility for working through stubborn materials like nylon rope and thick plastic.

Adjustable Clip
Personal preference dictates how you carry your knife, so Gerber designed the Propel AO with a three-way adjustable clip to customize the knife's orientation in your pocket or on your belt. You can set it for tip-up or tip-down storage and left-hand or right-hand bias.

Comfortable, Discreet Carry
To deserve daily use status, a utilitarian knife like the Propel AO needs to feel good in your hand and in your pocket. The composite G-10 handle's textured surface optimizes grip security in all conditions and maintains a slim profile that complements the knife's balanced feel, while the reliable plunge lock and safety switch secure the blade where you want it, be it open or stowed in your pocket. But most importantly, you get a full-size tactical knife that carries discreetly and comfortably, on the job and off.


  • Black oxide coating adds corrosion resistance and low reflectivity
  • Black G-10 handle provides sure -grip and durability in slim package
  • Pommel with lanyard hole adds utility
  • Gerber's Assisted Opening 2.0 design delivers smooth, one-handed blade deployment
  • Plunge lock and safety switch fix the blade in place, open or closed
  • Adjustable, three-position pocket clip allows customizable stowage
  • Backed by Gerber's Lifetime Warranty

Notable Specifications:


  • Overall Length: 8.52" (21.64 cm)
  • Blade Length: 3.5" (8.89 cm)
  • Closed Length: 5" (12.7 cm)
  • Weight: 4.28 oz. (121 g)
  • Steel Type: 420HC
  • Handle Material: G-10
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Gerber Propel AO Assisted Open Serrated Edge Knife 30-000840 Propel AO Assisted Open Serrated Edge Knife
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