Global Water GL500-2-1 Data Logger

Global Water GL500-2-1 Data Logger


The Global Water GL500-2-1 data logger feature two analog channels and one pulse channel for recording data, as well as monitoring battery voltage.


  • Rugged and easy to use
  • Records over 81,000 readings
  • Accepts any 4-20 mA signal
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The GL500-2-1 Data Logger features two analog channels and one pulse channel for recording data. The data logger records over 81,000 readings and has four unique recording options: fast (10 samples per second), programmable interval (1 second to multiple years), logarithmic, and exception. Start and stop alarm times can be programmed to synchronize multiple loggers, delay sampling until a preset time, or limit the number of recordings during a day. The GL500U-2-1 USB model is great for direct connection to a laptop or desktop PC.

The GL500-2-1 can monitor two 4-20mA sensors and features a scalable digital input that accepts switch closure signals and pulses from various external devices. The logger provides switched power to the sensors based on the programmable sample interval and sensor warm up time settings. Two- and three-wire sensors can be quickly connected to the datalogger’s internal terminal strip and calibrated via the included Global Logger II software.

The GL500-2-1 includes Global Logger II Windows software, which allow for easy setup, calibration, upload, and transfer to a spreadsheet program. NOTE: 64 bit operating systems are not currently supported.

What's Included:
  • (1) GL500U-2-1 Data Logger
  • (1) USB Cable, Type A to B
  • (1) Global Logger Interface Software CD
  • (1) Operations Manual
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Global Water GL500-2-1 Data Logger FR0000 GL500U-2-1 data logger, USB
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