Global Water RG200 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge

Global Water RG200 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge


Global Water's RG200 Rain Gauge is a durable weather instrument for monitoring rain rate and total rainfall.


  • Constructed of high impact UV-protected plastic
  • Reliable, highly accurate, and simple to operate
  • Durable and low-cost
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


Global Water's RG200 Rain Gauge is a durable weather instrument for monitoring rain rate and total rainfall. With minimal care, the rain gauge will provide many years of service. All rain gauges are constructed of high impact UV-protected plastic to provide reliable, low-cost rainfall monitoring. The simplicity of the rain gauge design assures trouble-free operation, yet provides accurate rainfall measurements.

RG200 rain gauges have a 6 inch orifice and are shipped complete with mounting brackets and 40 ft of two-conductor cable. The rain gauge sensor mechanism activates a sealed reed switch that produces a contact closure for each 0.01 inch or 0.25 mm of rainfall.
What's Included:
  • (1) RG200 rain gauge with 40 ft. cable
  • (1) Set of mounting screws, strainer, metric conversion weight
  • (1) Manual
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Global Water RG200 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge EJ0000 RG200 tipping bucket rain gauge, 6"
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Spectrum WatchDog 1115 Rain Logger 3635WD1 WatchDog 1115 rain gauge data logger
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Solinst Rainlogger Edge Rain Gauge Logger 111108 Rainlogger Edge rain gauge logger, includes 6' connection cable
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Questions & Answers

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What's the difference between the RG600 and RG200?
The RG200 is a 6" rain gauge with a 40 ft two-conductor cable. The RG600 is an 8" rain gauge with a 25 ft two-conductor cable.
How should I take care of my rain gauge?
The RG200 should be cleaned periodically. An accumulation of dirt, bugs, etc. on the tipping bucket will adversely affect the readings.

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