GME AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB Non-Hazmat

GME AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB Non-Hazmat


The GME AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB Non-Hazmat operates in conjunction with the COSPAS-SARSAT International Satellite Search & Rescue System.


  • Beacon is released at a certain depth and automatically activated
  • Non-hazardous battery packs that are IATA compliant and allow for restriction free transportation
  • Position location accuracy to within 5 kilometers
Free Shipping on this product
List Price
Your Price
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?


The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) compliant MT403FF is a 'state of the art'Enclosed satellite distress beacon designed to operate in conjunction with the COSPAS-SARSAT International Satellite Search and Rescue System.

Designed to meet the most demanding regulatory approvals the GME MT403FF is a Class 2, Category 1 EPIRB in a fully enclosed float free housing with a Hammar HRU that will release the beacon at a certain depth, the beacon will then automatically activate.

Using the same innovative technology that produced the MT400 and revolutionised the EPIRB world, the MT403FF now offers commercial vessel operators the same GME performance and value enjoyed by recreational boaters. A key feature of the MT403 series is the use of non-hazardous battery packs that are IATA compliant and allow for restriction free transportation.

The cost of 406 MHz beacon ownership has been dramatically lowered by the introduction of the MT403FF. GME's unique energy conserving microprocessor technology enables the battery replacement period to be extended to 6 years. This technology has significantly reduced both the size and accordingly the replacement price. The MT403FF is factory programmed with a unique serial number which should be registered with the appropriate national Search and Rescue Authority. In many countries, authorities permit the EPIRB to be coded with the vessel's Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) number or Radio Call Sign. This reprogramming is undertaken by a GME authorised Dealer.

Advantages of a 406 MHz EPIRB over the older analogue EPIRBs include world wide coverage, position location accuracy to within 5 kms, and a more stable transmitted signal resulting in faster response time. Most importantly, the addition of a unique digitally coded message provides Search and Rescue authorities with vital information including the country of beacon registration and identification of the vessel in distress, thus greatly reducing the incidence of false alerts and unneccesary deployment of valuable rescue resources.

An auxiliary homing transmitter is included in the MT403FF to enable suitably equipped Search and Rescue vessels to home in on the distress beacon.

GME has been designing and manufacturing EPIRB's for over 30 years, in that time literally hundreds of lives have been saved in Australia and around the world.

  • Unrivaled in technology, performance and price
  • COSPAS-SARSAT worldwide operation
  • Ground breaking microprocessor based design, delivers unparalleled performance and value
  • Meets AS/NZ 4280.1:2003 standards. C/S T.001/007. IMO A810 (19)
  • Zero warm-up digital technology
  • Non-hazardous IATA compliant battery pack for restriction free transportation
  • High intensity solid state strobe
  • Enclosed in a UV resistant float free housing that automatically deploys and activates the EPIRB when submersed to a depth of 2-4 meters
  • Rugged easy-to-mount design
  • 6 year battery life
  • Easy, in-built self-test with audio/visual alert
  • 6 year GME warranty

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
GME AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB Non-Hazmat MT-403FF AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB non-hazmat with bracket
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
GME AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB Non-Hazmat MT-403FG AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB non-hazmat with internal GPS and bracket
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
GME Hydrostatic Release for MT-403FF & MT-403FG MT-403FFSVC Hydrostatic release for MT-403FF and MT-403FG
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

GME AccuSat 406 CAT 1 EPIRB Non-Hazmat Reviews

| Write a Review

Be the first to write a review

Related Products

In The News

White Bear Lake Stands Out In Study Of Twin Cities Lakes

Following water level declines in lakes around the Twin Cities area of Minnesota, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey were interested in identifying the cause. What they found along with that was a large degree of variability between the lakes, based on geology, elevation and land use. That there was such variation isn’t too surprising, as Mother Nature is far from neat in laying things out. But the sheer size and scope of the study has a nice way of underscoring just how different individual lakes can be from one another even if they sit nearby. The effort, looking at 96 different lakes around Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., found wide variation in water levels over time. Some lakes gained in water levels while others nearby saw them decline.

Read More

West Antarctica Glaciers Melt At Pace Not Seen Before

Researchers with the University of California (UC), Irvine, and NASA have completed a pair of studies documenting the pace of glacier melt in West Antarctica. Their findings show that the melting there is occurring at a rate never before observed. The studies examined three neighboring glaciers that are melting and retreating at different rates. The Smith, Pope and Kohler glaciers flow into the Dotson and Crosson ice shelves in the Amundsen Sea embayment in West Antarctica, the part of the continent with the largest decline in ice. One, led by a UC Irvine researcher, looked at satellite records in its approach.

Read More

Figuring Out How Microplastics Move From Mussels To Fish

Microscopic beads and fabrics float in our waterways, get ingested by fish and other creatures, and impact the environment in lots of negative ways. But despite that knowledge, there is little we know about how these microplastics first enter aquatic food webs. In a pilot study, researchers at the University of Notre Dame are studying the dynamics of just how microscopic plastics are first transferred from filter feeders to fish. Their investigation is using asian clams and sculpins to pinpoint the interactions underway. The researchers originally wanted to use round gobies, a prolific invasive fish in Lake Erie.

Read More