2606945

Hach Nitrogen-Ammonia AmVer Salicylate Reagent Set

Hach Nitrogen-Ammonia AmVer Salicylate Reagent Set

Description

Hach Nitrogen-Ammonia AmVer Salicylate Reagent Set used for determination of high range ammonia nitrogen by the AmVer Salicylate Test 'N Tube Method.

Features

  • Determination of High Range Ammonia Nitrogen
  • Self-contained package for easy mixing and measurement
  • All necessary reagents and vials are contained in the package
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$99.05
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Notable Specifications:

  • Description : Nitrogen, Ammonia Reagent set, AmVer (Salicylate), HR
  • Instrument: DR 5000, DR 3900, DR 2800, DR 2700, DR/890, DR/850
  • Method: Salicylate
  • Parameter: Ammonia
  • Platform: TNT
  • Range: 0.4 - 50.0 mg/L NH3-N
  • Storage Temperature: 10 - 25 °C
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach Nitrogen-Ammonia AmVer Salicylate Reagent Set 2606945 Nitrogen-ammonia AmVer salicylate reagent set (high range), pack of 50
$99.05
Drop ships from manufacturer

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