147011

Hach pH Color Disc Kits

Hach pH Color Disc Kits

Description

Hach's unique color disc kits feature a continuous-gradient color wheel for fast, accurate comparisons.

Features

  • Continuous-gradient color wheel for fast, accurate comparisons
  • Accurate to +/-10% or +/- the smallest increment, subject to individual color perception
  • Kits use a blank as a reference in color comparison, compensating for color in the sample
Your Price
$80.99
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Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Hach's unique color disc kits feature a continuous-gradient color wheel for fast, accurate comparisons. The continuous color provides higher levels of accuracy. Kits also use a blank as a reference in color comparison, compensating for color in the sample.

Simply react the sample, then insert the blank and the sample into the holder. Rotate the color wheel to obtain a color match between the blank and the reacted sample. Accuracy for color disc kits is typically +/- 10% or +/- the smallest increment, subject to individual color perception.
What's Included:
  • (1) Indicator Reagent
  • (1) Color Discs
  • (1) Color Comparator Box
  • (2) Viewing Tubes
  • (1) Instruction Sheet
  • (1) Carrying Case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach pH Color Disc Kits 147011 pH test kit, 17N, 4-10 pH, 300 tests
$80.99
Drop ships from manufacturer
Hach pH Color Disc Kits 147009 pH test kit, 17J, 7.8-10.0 pH, 200 tests
$86.49
Drop ships from manufacturer
Hach pH Color Disc Kits 147006 pH test kit, 17F, 5.5-8.5 pH, 200 tests
$86.49
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach Bromthymol Blue Indicator Solution 25532 Bromthymol blue indicator solution, 100mL MDB
$16.45
Drop ships from manufacturer
Additional Product Information:

Hach pH Color Disc Kit Manual

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