LZW5060.97.0002

Hach sensION+ 5060 Portable Platinum Conductivity Cell

Hach sensION+ 5060 Portable Platinum Conductivity Cell

Description

Hach sensION+ 5060 Portable Platinum Conductivity Cell is a three-pole platinum conductivity cell with a polycarbonate body and built-in temperature sensor.

Features

  • Protected against harsh field conditions
  • Heavy-duty electrode handle design optimized for field calibration and storage
  • Ideal for conductivity measurements in general aqueous applications
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$327.00
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Details

The Hach sensION+ 5060 Portable Platinum Conductivity Cell is a three-pole platinum conductivity cell with a polycarbonate body and built-in temperature sensor. It has a fixed 1 meter cable and MP5 connector dedicated for use with Hach sensION+ Portable Conductivity meters. The 5060 is ideal for conductivity measurements in general aqueous applications.

 

The Hach sensION+ 5060 Portable Platinum Conductivity Cell's resilient poly-carbonate body, handle, and MP5 connecter ensure protected performance in the field. It's heavy-duty electrode handle design is optimized for field calibration and storage, as the tubes screw directly onto the electrode handle. This design provides a secure interface between the electrode and calibration/storage tube, reducing risk of contamination.

Notable Specifications:
  • Material Sensor Body: Outside: Polycarbonate; Inside: Glass
  • Measuring range conductivity: 0.2 µS/cm to 200 mS/cm
  • Parameter: Conductivity
  • Temperature Range: 0 to 80 °C
  • Temperature range: pH: 0 to 80 °C
  • Temperature Sensor: Pt 1000
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach sensION+ 5060 Portable Platinum Conductivity Cell LZW5060.97.0002 sensION+ 5060 portable platinum conductivity cell, general purpose applications
$327.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Fondriest Environmental 1,413 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS1413-P Conductivity standard, 1,413 uS, 500mL bottle
$13.04
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