2075333

Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags

Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags

Description

Hach's Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags are specially designed for chlorinated water samples and comply with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria.

Features

  • Complies with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria
  • Specially designed for chlorinated water samples
  • Transparent polyethylene material is sterile (certified) and disposable
Your Price
$34.95
Drop ships from manufacturer

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Hach's Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags are specially designed for chlorinated water samples and comply with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria. The transparent polyethylene material is disposable and features a Whirl-Pak closure. The bags a contain non-nutritive pill with 10 mg sodium thiosulfate that will dechlorinate up to 10 mg/Cl2 in a 100 mL sample. Each bag has four ounce and 100 mL fill-lines and a 'write-on' strip that accepts waterproof ink.
Notable Specifications:
  • Capacity: 100 mL
  • Quantity: 100 bags per pack
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags 2075333 Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags with Dechlorinating Agent, 177 mL, pack of 100
$34.95
Drop ships from manufacturer

In The News

For Living Waters for the World, the mission is clean drinking water

In Tabasco, Mexico, water is left undrinkable by mineral deposits in soil and a coastal aquifer that runs beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Many communities can’t treat it and depend on trucks to bring in drinking water. But for one small community there, a mission group helped reduce its dependence on outside water by setting up and donating a custom water filtration system. A church houses the system and gives treated water to those who can’t afford it at no cost. The water is otherwise sold commercially at half the price offered by other bottlers. Living Waters for the World is a mission project of the Presbyterian Church - USA and is no stranger to water treatment projects.

Read More

Army Corps of Engineers Protects River Wildlife

A complex series of locks and dams up and down the Ohio River enable interstate commerce, travel and recreation by maintaining a usable pathway for watercraft, but come with the inevitable byproducts of disrupting the river’s natural systems. To combat this, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers uses a complex monitoring and response technology designed to minimize the negative impacts of dredging on the river ecosystem. Steven Foster, a limnologist with the Corps Water Quality Team, works at the Robert C. Byrd Lock and Dam in Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia. He said one key area he focuses on is the welfare of mussels in the river. River dredging can smother mussel beds, so Foster and the team of engineers monitor the beds to ensure their safety.

Read More

Researchers Track Glacial Meltwater On Its Surprising Journey

While the scientific community has formed its consensus on how ice sheets are shrinking in and around Greenland, some researchers are tracking what happens to the meltwater as it drains into the ocean each summer. Their study, published in Nature Geoscience by an interdisciplinary team of biologists, oceanographers and hydrologists, used computer models to simulate the meltwater to see where currents take it and what effect it could have on the ocean. Renato Castelao, one of the researchers and an associate professor of marine science for the University of Georgia, said one of the biggest discoveries of the study was the surprising final destinations of the ice sheets as they melt into the ocean each summer.

Read More