Hach Total Nitrogen Reagent Set

Hach Total Nitrogen Reagent Set


Hach total nitrogen reagent set measures total nitrogen by the Persulfate Digestion Test 'N Tube method.


  • Provide safe, convenient testing
  • Easy ordering
  • Perform digestions and photometric measurements in the same vial
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The Hach total nitrogen reagent set provides safe, convenient testing of total nitrogen. The capped 16-mm vials provide a self-contained package to perform digestions and photometric measurements in one place. Each test can measure a range of 0.5 to 25.0 mg/L of nitrogen by the Persulfate Digestion Test 'N Tube method.
Notable Specifications:
  • Tests: 25 - 50 (Dependent on number of reagent blanks)
  • Description : Nitrogen, total, TNT Reagent Set
  • Digestion Required: Yes
  • Instrument: All except DR/850, DR/820, PC II
  • Method: Persulfate Digestion
  • Parameter: Nitrogen, total
  • Range: 0.5 - 25.0 mg/LN
  • Storage Temperature: 10 - 25 °C
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach Total Nitrogen Reagent Set 2672245 Total nitrogen reagent set, 0 to 25 ppm, 50 tests
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