HawkEye FishTrax FishFinders

HawkEye FishTrax FishFinders


The HawkEye FishTrax FishFinder allows you to fish from a Dock, Bridge, Shoreline, Boat, Kayak, Canoe, Ice, and anywhere else your tacklebox can go.


  • Audible Fish Alarm Signals The Presence Of Fish
  • Adaptive Software Programming Minimizes False Readings
  • VairableZone Water Temperature Sensor Shows Water Temperature Throughout The Water Column
List Price
Your Price
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?


The Go Anywhere, Do Anything, Fish Finder...
FishTrax intelligent sonar delivers precise fish finder readings up to 240'. Audible fish alarm signals the presence of fish. VariableZone water temperature sensor shows water temperature throughout the water column. Weed and rock indicators indicate bottom composition. Glare-Free icon LCD with LED backlight offers excellent readability. EasyTouch user interface makes system setup and adjustment easy. The F1TP comes with a Airmar transducer that is float-able, troll-able or can be boat mounted, that way you know you are getting an unmatched, go anywhere portable device. We know how important it is to have as much space on your kayak, canoe or dinghy as possible, that is why the FishTrax1 runs off of 4 AAA batteries. Giving you at least 30 hours of battery life. Which means there is no need to have a heavy battery pack installed in your kayak, canoe or dingy taking up all your precious room. Leaving you with more room for other gear.
To Use: Simply turn the power on, toss the unique floating sonar sensor from the shoreline, bridge, or boat and instant depth, fish, weed, and bottom contour readings are now in the palm of your hand.


  • FishTrax™ Intelligent Sonar Delivers Precise Fish FinderReadings up to 240'
  • Weed and Rock Indicators Indicate Bottom Composition
  • Glare-Free Icon LCD with LED Backlight offers Excellent Readability
  • EasyTouch™ User Interface Makes System Setup And Adjustment Easy
  • Airmar Transducer is Trollable, Boat Mountable, & Floatable... Achieves Unmatched, Go Anywhere, Portability(*)
  • Built-In Expandability Allows Addition of Accessories To Adapt To Any Fishing Platform
  • Sonar Sensor Side-Scan Adapter Allows Sonar Direction Finding Under Weeds, Docks, Ice, etc
  • Includes User Friendly Color Coded Operation Manual and Free Access to a 24 Hour Online Technical Support Center
  • Industry Leading 2 Year Warranty

(**) For the depth and fish sonar features of this unit to function properly, the sonar sensor must be in direct contact with the water or a boat hull as per the instructions in the operator's manual. Readings are NOT obtainable through the air.

How To Catch More Fish With Hawkeye® Fish Finders

Adjust the Sensitivity:
There are 5 user selectable sensitivity settings to choose from. It greatly depends on the clarity and/or depth of the water. Very clear water allows for a moderate sensitivity setting. Conversely, dirty water requires a higher sensitivity setting to target detail but will increase the irritating false readings. Targeting deep water fish generally requires greater sensitivity, especially in stained or dirty water. Salt and brackish water also require a comparatively higher sensitivity setting. While this analysis may seem confusing, the concept is simple. As the unit's sensitivity is elevated, a broader view and smaller details show on the screen. But, with a broader and stronger view comes more clutter and debris. The clearer the water, the less sensitivity needed to get accurate details and vice-versa.

Use the Fish Alarm:
You can set the FishTrax™ 1 to sound an audible alarm when a group of fish are detected. Turn it on, and when a fish passes under the sonar sensor, an audible alarm will sound. You can then use the fish depth scale to drop your bait to a depth that will get it in front of the fish. Leave the alarm on if you are using a crank bait so that you do not have to steadily watch for fish on the screen. If you hear the alarm, gently toss your bait at least 20' beyond the sonar sensor, allow the bait to drop to the depth of the fish alarm, and retrieve as recommended for the targeted species.

Maximize Side-Scanning
Here are some ideas for maximizing the usefulness of the Side Scan Adapter: Attach it to a dock piling and scan sideways for fish swimming by. Attach it to a boat, kayak, or canoe hull and slow troll for fish, all the while keeping a look out for fish behind or in front of you. Attach it to a broom stick handle and search for the best fishing location. Attach it to a broom stick and seek out the fish hiding away from your fishing hole while ice fishing.

Broom Stick Side-Scanning
By attaching the optional Side-Scan Adapter to an ordinary broom stick or paint roller handle purchased from a local hardware store, you can scan for fish suspended in the water column within 240' (75M) of your location. Attach the sensor to a handle, lower the sensor into the water, and slowly move the sensor in a manner that will allow the signal to search the desired location (a sweeping motion similar to using a flashlight is most effective). Keep in mind the sonar signal is emitted from the base of the sensor. Scan down, sideways, or any combination of the two. Remember, to get depth and bottom contour and composition readings you will have to aim the signal at a solid object within 240' (75M), however FISH readings will be accurate, even if the depth reading is "---"

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
HawkEye FishTrax FishFinders FT1P FishTrax Fishfinder, Portable with LCD VirtuView Display
In Stock
HawkEye FishTrax Handheld Fish Finder w/HD Color VirtuView Display FT1PXC FishTrax FishFinder, Handheld with HD Color VirtuView Display
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

HawkEye FishTrax FishFinders Reviews

| Write a Review

Be the first to write a review

In The News

First Environmental Monitoring System For Baltimore’s Inner Harbor

Baltimore’s Inner Harbor and the rivers that flow into it are important sources of water to Chesapeake Bay, popular recreation sites and the targets of an ambitious clean-up plan. But the city has for some time lacked an environmental monitoring system for tracking water quality in the harbor continuously. That is about to change, thanks to a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It will lead to the new installation of a suite of sensors that will provide the public and scientists with the first comprehensive, real time look at water quality in the harbor.

Read More

Parasite Behind Yellowstone River Fish Kill Found In Other Rivers

A parasite that caused a massive fish kill in Montana’s Yellowstone River has been found in at least seven other rivers in the state, according to the Bozeman Daily Chronicle . Scientists with the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks department made the find. So far, the parasite has been confirmed in the upper and lower Madison, East Gallatin, Bighorn, Stillwater, and Boulder Rivers. It had already been confirmed in the Jefferson and Shields Rivers. The microscopic parasite causes proliferative kidney disease, one of the most serious diseases to impact whitefish and trout. The effect of the disease on Yellowstone’s fish populations is exacerbated by other stressors like near-record low flows, consistent high temperatures and the disturbance caused by recreational activities.

Read More

ESPniagara Tracks Algal Toxins In Lake Erie, Protects Drinking Water

It may have taken 20 years and $20 million to develop, but Lake Erie researchers working to fight harmful algal blooms (HABs) now have a new tool to safeguard drinking water: ESPniagara. The advanced sampler has been called a “lab in a can” for its ability to sample microcystins, the most common algal toxin these days, in almost real time. The big gadget’s name is a mashup between “ESP,” for environmental sample processor, and the name of Admiral Oliver Hazard Perry’s ship during the War of 1812. “We wanted to name it something that was significant to Lake Erie,” said Tim Davis, molecular biologist and lead HABs researcher at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (NOAA GLERL) in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Read More