5116

Heron barLog NANO Barometric Pressure Logger

Heron barLog NANO Barometric Pressure Logger

Description

The barLog NANO is used for long-term, automatic barometric compensation with the Heron dipperLog NANO.

Features

  • Can be with synchronized with multiple dipperLog NANO's at the same site
  • DipperLog program compensates with the barLog NANO according to time and date matches
  • Fully automated interaction
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$310.00
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Details

The Heron barLog NANO barometric pressure logger is designed for long-term, automatic barometric pressure compensation with the Heron dipperLog NANO. The barLog NANO can be used in conjunction with multiple dipperLog NANO water level loggers at the same site.

The fully automated operation ensures that there is no need for elevation correction or post processing of any data. The dipperLog program will coordinate the barLog NANO pressure logger with matching dipperLog NANO's at the same site and will compsenate according to the time and date matches.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Heron barLog NANO Barometric Pressure Logger 5116 barLog NANO barometric pressure logger
$310.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Heron dipperLog NANO USB Communication Cable 5009 USB communication cable
$99.00
Drop ships from manufacturer

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