1500-1

Heron Water Level Meter Motorized Power Reel

Heron Water Level Meter Motorized Power Reel

Description

Heron power reels are powered by a 12 VDC battery and designed to accommodate tape lengths longer than 2000 ft. or 600m.

Features

  • Integrated battery clips connect to a vehicle battery
  • Momentary switches revert to 'off' when not physically held in 'on' position
  • Hand crank also included
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Heron Water Level Meter Motorized Power Reel 1500-1 Motorized power reel for water level meter tapes, regular (6") Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron Water Level Meter Motorized Power Reel 1500-2 Motorized power reel for water level meter tapes, large (12")
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Heron dipper-T Replacement Tape 1812 dipper-T replacement tape, 2500' Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron dipper-T Replacement Tape 1836 dipper-T replacement tape, 750m Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron dipper-T Replacement Tape 1813 dipper-T replacement tape, 3000' Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron dipper-T Replacement Tape 1837 dipper-T replacement tape, 900m Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron dipper-T Replacement Tape 1814 dipper-T replacement tape, 3500' Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron dipper-T Replacement Tape 1838 dipper-T replacement tape, 1100m Drop ships from manufacturer
Heron dipper-T Replacement Probe 1403 dipper-T replacement probe, detachable version for 4-digit SN's ending in -T
$115.00
Drop ships from manufacturer

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