HSM9-D

HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental

HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental

Description

Hydrographic Surveying ADCP & Software

Features

  • Boat mount system for hydrographic surveys
  • Automatic data gridding and interpolation
  • Interface for customer-supplied GPS and/or heading sensor
Your Price
$622.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The HydroSurveyor is a system designed to collect bathymetric, water column velocity profile, and acoustic bottom tracking data as part of a hydrographic survey.

What's Included:
  • (1) HydroSurveyor acoustic Doppler current profiler
  • (1) 10m power & RS232 serial communications cable
  • (1) Boat mount
  • (1) Carrying case
  • (1) HydroSurveyor Windows software
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental HSM9-D Rental of SonTek HydroSurveyor ADCP with 10m cable & boat mount, priced per day
$622.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental HSM9-2D Rental of SonTek HydroSurveyor ADCP with 10m cable & boat mount, priced per 2-day period
$995.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental HSM9-W Rental of SonTek HydroSurveyor ADCP with 10m cable & boat mount, priced per week
$1741.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental HSM9-2W Rental of SonTek HydroSurveyor ADCP with 10m cable & boat mount, priced per 2-week period
$2612.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
HydroSurveyor ADCP Rental HSM9-M Rental of SonTek HydroSurveyor ADCP with 10m cable & boat mount, priced per month
$3731.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Yuma Tablet Computer Rental YUMA-D Rental of Trimble Yuma rugged Windows 7 tablet computer, priced per day
$60.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Additional Product Information:

Related Products

In The News

VIMS scientists develop ROV to help monitor oil spills

Scientists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science are working to develop an underwater robot to aid in the cleanup of oil spills, according to a release from the College of William & Mary . The prototypical device uses sound waves to help judge different aspects of oil slicks. Other methods to judge the volume, extent or thickness of a spill typically just involve visual inspections. The remotely operated vehicle in development at VIMS, called the Acoustic Slick Thickness ROV, will better those inspections by using acoustic technology to locate and assess spills more quickly and easily. VIMS scientists are developing the new ROV at the Ohmsett Wave Tank, which is maintained at the National Oil Spill Response Research and Renewable Energy Test Facility.

Read More

Army Corps of Engineers Protects River Wildlife

A complex series of locks and dams up and down the Ohio River enable interstate commerce, travel and recreation by maintaining a usable pathway for watercraft, but come with the inevitable byproducts of disrupting the river’s natural systems. To combat this, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers uses a complex monitoring and response technology designed to minimize the negative impacts of dredging on the river ecosystem. Steven Foster, a limnologist with the Corps Water Quality Team, works at the Robert C. Byrd Lock and Dam in Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia. He said one key area he focuses on is the welfare of mussels in the river. River dredging can smother mussel beds, so Foster and the team of engineers monitor the beds to ensure their safety.

Read More

Researchers Track Glacial Meltwater On Its Surprising Journey

While the scientific community has formed its consensus on how ice sheets are shrinking in and around Greenland, some researchers are tracking what happens to the meltwater as it drains into the ocean each summer. Their study, published in Nature Geoscience by an interdisciplinary team of biologists, oceanographers and hydrologists, used computer models to simulate the meltwater to see where currents take it and what effect it could have on the ocean. Renato Castelao, one of the researchers and an associate professor of marine science for the University of Georgia, said one of the biggest discoveries of the study was the surprising final destinations of the ice sheets as they melt into the ocean each summer.

Read More