In-Situ BaroTROLL Barometric Pressure Logger

In-Situ BaroTROLL Barometric Pressure Logger


The In-Situ BaroTROLL barometric pressure logger gives the user an easy way to integrate barometric pressure compensation using In-Situ's Baro Merge software.


  • Accurate stainless steel sensor reduces the potential for drift over time
  • Ultra-low power system guarantees 5 years or 1 million readings
  • Rugged stainless steel housing
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Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Why Buy From Fondriest?
Notable Specifications:
  • Barometric Pressure
  • Sensor Type: Silicon Strain Gauge
  • Material: 316L Stainless Steel
  • Accuracy from 0 to 50 C: +/-0.1% Full Scale (FS)
  • Resolution: +/-0.015% FS or Better
  • Temperature
  • Sensor Type: Silicon
  • Range: 0 to 50 C
  • Resolution: 0.1 C
  • Accuracy: +/-0.3 C
  • Logging
  • Memory: 1MB; 50,000+ data points
  • Log Types: Linear, Fast Linear, Event
  • Fastest Polling Rate: 2 per second
  • General
  • Operational Temperature Range: -20 to 80 C
  • Diameter: 0.82" OD (20.8mm)
  • Length: 9.0" (22.9cm)
  • Weight: 0.54 lb (0.24 kg)
  • Output Options: Modbus RS485, SDI-12, 4-20mA
  • Housing: 316L Stainless Steel
What's Included:
  • (1) In-Situ BaroTROLL barometric pressure logger
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
In-Situ BaroTROLL Barometric Pressure Logger 0089100 BaroTROLL barometric pressure logger, 1.14 bar range (16.5 PSIA) Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
In-Situ Titanium Twist-Lock Backshell 0051480 Titanium twist-Lock backshell/hanger for non-vented Level TROLL, Aqua TROLL & BaroTROLL loggers
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
In-Situ USB TROLL Com Direct Connect Bundle 0052510 USB TROLL Com direct connect bundle, includes direct-connect programming cable and Win-Situ 5.0 Software CD
In Stock
In-Situ Level TROLL Maintenance Kit 0052530 Level TROLL maintenance kit, includes O-rings, dust caps, lube, and instructions
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

In-Situ BaroTROLL Barometric Pressure Logger Reviews

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Questions & Answers

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Can the BaroTROLL record data?
Yes the In-Situ BaroTROLL can record up to 100,000 data sets.
How long will the BaroTROLL last?
The BaroTROLL battery will last a minimum of 2 million readings or five years.

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